The Doctrine of the Church Of England at the Time of The Reformation

The Doctrine of the Church Of England at the Time of The Reformation

Of The Reformation Itself, Of Scripture, And Of The Church Of Rome, Briefly Compared With The Remarks Of The Regius Professor Of Divinity1

I shall first shortly state the reasons which induce me to take notice of, and comment on, the “Remarks “upon the sermon lately preached at St. Mary’s. If the Regius Professor of Divinity had simply undertaken to refute the sermon preached at St. Mary’s, to which his remarks apply, it might perhaps have been unbecoming, or at the least premature, for a third person to enter into the discussion, or do more than watch its progress. But this is expressly disclaimed, and a very different office is assumed. “I must now come,” says the pamphlet referred to, “to the exposition of the gospel; and I trust that I shall not be thought unreasonable or presumptuous, if I say at once that I am not entering into controversy.” It is true the author professes, at the close of the “Remarks,” “I am not entering into controversy, but am merely stating facts.” But for this purpose he has said a great deal too much. “When the doctrine of the Church is misrepresented,” he continues, “and there is danger of young disciples being misled, I feel it my duty as a faithful soldier of Christ to stand between the dead and the living, and to stay the plague.”

Syndicate content