Revelation: Chapter 13


In this chapter, we are introduced to the unholy trinity. In the Holy Trinity, we have God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit. In Rev. 12:9, we see the imitation of the Father in the great red dragon. The first beast of Rev. 13 (the Antichrist) is the imitation of the Lord Jesus Christ. The second beast in Rev. 13:11-18), also known as the false prophet, imitates the third person of the Trinity, the Holy Spirit. In the form of this counterfeit trinity, Satan will launch his greatest effort to deceive the nations of the world, successfully. Paul describes the nature of this man, the Antichrist (explain). See 2 Thess. 2:9-10. “Even him, whose coming is after the working of Satan with all power and signs and lying wonders, and with all deceivableness…”

Revelation: Chapter 12


This is one of the great prophetic chapters of the Bible. An understanding of its contents is essential to the correct interpretation of prophecy. Only a small part of the chapter fits into the sequence of events during the Tribulation. The chapter is really an inset providing the necessary information about the past, present, and future events concerning Christ, Israel and Satan. Chapter 12 reveals “the conflict of the ages.” This conflict involves Israel, Christ and Satan. There are four great passages brought to our attention in the chapter: (1) The Woman [Rev. 12:1-2], (2) The Great Red Dragon [Rev. 12:3-4], (3) The Man-Child [Rev. 12:5-6], and (4) Michael, the Archangel [Rev. 12:7-12]. It will be our purpose here to look at each of these more closely.


The Woman (Rev. 12:1-2)

There appeared a great “sign” in heaven. The appearance of this woman is a sign or symbol of an important truth. It is a miraculous signpost. Who is this woman? [Describe her at this point]

The Bible is its own best interpretation. In Genesis 37, at 17 years old, Joseph had a dream. He dreamt that the sun and moon and eleven stars bowed down to him. His family understood the dream and resented it, for it referred to his father (Jacob), mother (Rachel), and eleven brothers bowing down to him. Joseph’s dreams came true. They bowed down before him three times with their faces to the ground. The woman John saw here in Rev. 12 is clothed with the sun, the moon under her feet, and crowned with a crown of twelve stars. This identifies her as the nation of Israel, the descendants of Jacob and Rachel.

Revelation: Chapter 10

The Mighty Angel and the Little Book

Chapters 10-14 in the Book of Revelation are parenthetic. They do not advance the chronology of the book. Instead, they give us some facts that help us to better understand the total prophetic picture. In this interlude between the sixth and seventh trumpets, we are introduced to three personalities: the mighty angel and the two witnesses.


The Mighty Angel

Revelation 10:1-7 – The angel: came down from heaven, was clothed with a cloud, had a rainbow upon his head, had a face that was like the sun, and had feet that were like pillars of fire. In Rev. 1:2, we see “He had in his hand a little scroll” - the title deeds of the world. It also contained the revelation of future prophecies. “He also set his right foot on the sea and his left on the land.” The sea is referring to the masses – the Gentiles – and the land is referring to the nation of Israel.

This angel is claiming universal authority for Jesus Christ. The angel sat on the rolled away stone. Christ’s work was finished. “The angels’ work was about to begin.” Christ stood triumphantly. “The Kingdom of this world is about to become the kingdom of the Lord, and of His Christ, and He shall reign forever and ever.” See Rev. 11:15. [Describe the coming glory of the reigning King.]

In Rev. 10:3-4, the angel cried with a loud voice like a lion; then there were seven thunders. These thundering voices evidently conveyed a message. John was about to write it down, but was told not to do so. What the messages were remains a mystery.


The Times of Gentiles

And they shall fall by the edge of the sword, and shall be led away captive into all nations; and Jerusalem shall be trodden down of the Gentiles, until the times of the Gentiles be fulfilled (Lk. 21:24). The term, "times of the Gentiles," is only found once in the Word of God, and that is in Luke 21 where our Lord Jesus Christ Himself so designates the entire period during which the children of Israel are wanderers among the nations, and Jerusalem and the land of Palestine are trodd...

The World of a Jew

Turn on the TV on almost any night to watch the news and Israel, her people and land will be mentioned at some point. Why does this nation, few in number by comparison, and this land, tiny by any standard, command so much world attention? Israel, after all is a small arid land much of which is desert or mountains with few natural resources outside of the chemicals mined from the Dead Sea. The resorts along the Mediterranean Sea would attract some visitors naturally, bu...

Diligence in the Day of Salvation - Luke 19:11-27

“The Parable of the Pounds” or “Diligence in the Day of Salvation” Luke 19:11-27   This parable deals with the responsibility of Christians to make good on the opportunities that the Lord gives to serve Him and represent Him in the world.  It is similar to the Parable of the Talents (Matt. 25) but differs in many respects. This was given on a different occasion, at a different place and has a different emphasis. The parables of the Lord were often s...

The Day of Christ and the Day of the Lord

A number of references are made in the NT to the Day of Christ or the Day of the Lord Jesus. The Apostle Paul, seeking to encourage the Philippian Christians, stated in Phil. 1:6: “Being confident of this very thing that He which hath begun a good work in you will perform it until the day of Jesus Christ.” He would go on to exhort them to “approve the things that are excellent that ye might be sincere and without offense till the day of Christ.” (v. 10). Later in this same epistle, Paul stated that he hoped they would hold forth the Word of life so that he might rejoice in the day of Christ, so that he would not have run in vain neither labored in vain. (2:16) Likewise, to the Corinthian assembly — an assembly known for it’s blatant carnality, he could positively affirm the sanctifying work that the Lord would ultimately accomplish in their lives when he reminded them: “He shall also confirm you unto the end, that ye may be blameless in the day of our Lord Jesus Christ.” (1 Cor. 1:8)


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