Outlines

Matthew 8

Chapter 8 begins the third section of the book.

In the first section Chs. 1-4 to verse 11, the King is introduced.  His Genealogy - Birth and early Life are described.

The second section reveals the principles and laws with which He would govern the Kingdom - The Sermon on the Mount.  Chs. 5-7.

The third section Ch. 8-12 reveal the power of the King to implement those laws and also tell us of the tragic rejection of the King.

The Gospel of Matthew is composed of five groups of “sayings,” or bodies of truth.  Each group is concluded by similar words to those that close the Sermon on the Mount.  “When Jesus had ended these sayings.” Ch 7:28.  In His Sermon we have Christ as the TEACHER instructing His disciples.

The next time these words occur is in Ch. 11:1.  In the body of truth before this Christ is revealed as MASTER instructing His servants.

The third mention Ch. 13:53 closes the group of parables of the Kingdom where Christ reveals Himself as the KING informing His subjects.

The fourth mention Ch. 19:1 concludes the discourse on the Church (16-18) and shows Christ as the HEAD addressing His members.

The last mention Ch. 26:1 follows our Lords discourse on the end times and sets forth Christ as JUDGE entering into account with His creatures.

An understanding of the break-up of the Book will help us to see more clearly the truths Jesus is teaching.

In the section now before us we see the power of the King and also the MASTER instructing His servants.

Isaiah wrote 800 years before Christ was born, that when the Messiah came He would
Open the eyes of the blind.
    Unstop the ears of the deaf.

Matthew 12

In chapter 11 the Lord has been rejected by the nation.

His total rejection is summarized in the attitude of three of the prominent cities of Galilee. Chorazin – Bethsaida - Capernaum.

The Lord pronounced judgment upon them because of their rejection of Him. Interestingly, the destruction of Chorazin and Bethsaida is so complete that no trace of them can be found.  Also, the location of Capernaum is uncertain.

Tiberius, one of the larger cities in Galilee, which was more receptive to Christ and therefore escaped His judgment, is still standing and enjoying a good measure of prosperity.

This should encourage us as it illustrates our Savior’s omnipotence and omniscience and the unfailing reliability of the Scriptures.

The final rejection of Christ by the Pharisees caused them to observe the life of the Lord and His disciples more minutely to justify their position.

They found their opportunity when they saw the disciples violating the Sabbath verses 1 thru 8 of Chapter 12.  And Jesus healing the man with the paralyzed hand on the Sabbath verses 9-13.

The Lord and His disciples were walking through the corn fields, to satisfy their hunger the disciples plucked some ears of corn.  The Pharisees took this rather flimsy piece of evidence and accused the disciples of breaking the Sabbath.

The Lord immediately defended his disciples by presenting three arguments.

(1) David’s experience, verses 3 and 4. 1 Samuel 21:1-6.  David ate consecrated bread which was reserved for the priests alone.  For this act David was not condemned by the nation, nor by God.

He and his men did this when he was rejected by them.  If he had been given his rightful place as king and he and his men would not have had to eat the shewbread.

Last Visit to Nazareth

Matthew 13:53-58

Hebrews 11 (Unknown)

(The composer of this outline is unknown) I.     FAITH LOOKS AHEAD TO A HOPE OR EXPECTATION NOT YET REALIZED (v.1)     A.     Abel’s offering (v.4) looked ahead to Calvary and the forgiveness of sins.     B.     Enoch’s walk (v.5) looked ahead to the pleasures that God had stored up for him     C.      Noah’s preparation (v.7) looked ahead to a terrible day of ju...(The composer of this outline is unknown)

I.     FAITH LOOKS AHEAD TO A HOPE OR EXPECTATION NOT YET REALIZED (v.1)
    A.     Abel’s offering (v.4) looked ahead to Calvary and the forgiveness of sins.
    B.     Enoch’s walk (v.5) looked ahead to the pleasures that God had stored up for him

The Bible Its Pentateuchal Structure

      THE Bible as a whole has sixty-three books; Samuel, Kings, and Chronicles being really only one each: our present division of them having been adopted from the Septuagint. And 63 = 7 X 32. Here we have, then, the symbol of perfection, and that of divine manifestation intensified,- "God glorified in His perfectly accomplished work."      It is, as God's testimony to man, divided into two parts, perfectly distinct, the Old Testament...
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