Justification

Romans

Introduction to the Epistles

So far, we have discussed the historical section of the New Testament, namely the Gospels and Acts. We now turn our attention to the epistles, which could be termed the doctrinal section. Of the twenty-seven books of the New Testament, twenty-one are in the form of letters. Each writer, though inspired by the Spirit, leaves the impress of his own personality on his writings. For instance:

- Paul is the apostle of faith.

- Peter is the apostle of hope.

- John is the apostle of love.

- James is the apostle of works.

- Jude is the apostle of vigilance.

 

The New Testament is broken up into three groups of writings.

1. Nine Christian Church epistles (Romans – II Thessalonians)

Chapter 4: Justification

Be it known unto you therefore, men and brethren, that through this man is preached unto you the forgiveness of sins: and by him all that believe are justified from all things, from which ye could not be justified by the law of Moses (Acts 13:38, 39).

Justification! It is a big word, and very often people miss its true meaning. What is it to be justified? It is to be cleared of all blame, to be freed from every charge. It is the sentence of the court in favor of the prisoner. The prisoner stands there, charged with certain things; the evidence is all heard, and the jury brings in a verdict of “Not guilty.” The man is justified.

Notice a most remarkable thing in these two verses. We have two things here which God does for the believing sinner that no man could do for anyone else. You could not both forgive a man and justify him at the same time. If you forgive him, he cannot be justified. He must be guilty, and therefore there is something to forgive. On the other hand, if you justify him, then you do not need to forgive him. Suppose, for instance, one had been charged with a certain crime, and after everything had been heard, the jury says, “Not guilty,” and the judge pronounces him free. As that man comes out of the courtroom, a friend says to him, “It was kind of the judge to forgive you, wasn’t it?” The man replies, “He did not forgive me; I did not require his forgiveness. I was justified; I was proven not guilty and did not need to be forgiven.”

Syndicate content