Son of Hope - David Berkowitz

May God bless everyone who is reading this message. My name is Romans 10:13. It says, "For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved." Here it is clear that God has no favorites. He rejects no one, but welcomes all who call upon Him.I know that God is a God of mercy who is willing to forgive. He is perfectly able to restore and heal our hurting and broken lives. I have discovered from the Bible that Jesus Christ died for our sins. He took our place on the cross. He ...

Forgiveness of sins: What is it?

Forgiveness of sins: What is it? C. H. Mackintosh. "Oh! the blessedness; transgression forgiven; sin covered." This truly is blessedness, and without this, blessedness must be unknown. To have the full assurance that my sins are all forgiven, is the only foundation of true happiness. To be happy without this, is to be happy on the brink of a yawning gulf into which I may, at any moment, be dashed for ever. It is utterly impossible that any one can enjoy solid happiness until he is possessed ...

Our Advocate and Forgiveness

It is a blessed thing for one to know Christ as his Savior but more blessed to know the Savior. Paul could say, “I know whom I have believed” (2 Tim. 1:12), but also desired to “know Him and the power of His resurrection” (Phil. 3:10). The Lord Jesus Christ not only became man to die for our sins but is now a risen, glorified man in heaven, the High Priest and Advocate of His people. As High Priest, He is touched with the feeling of our infirmities and lives to strengthe...

Judicial and Parental Forgiveness - What's the Difference?

Two different kinds of forgiveness are found in the Scriptures, and if we are going to be careful students of the Word, we must learn to distinguish them. We will call them judicial and parental forgiveness (though these names are not used in the Bible).

To put it very simply, judicial forgiveness is the forgiveness of a judge and parental forgiveness is the forgiveness of a father. The first term is taken from the courtroom and the second from the home.

First let us go to the courtroom. God is the Judge and sinful man is the person on trial. Man is guilty of sinning, and the penalty is eternal death. But the Lord Jesus appears and announces, “I will pay the penalty which man’s sins deserved; I will die as a Substitute for him!” This is what the Savior did on the Cross of Calvary. Now the Judge announces to sinful man, “If you will surrender to my Son as your Lord and Savior, I will forgive you.” As soon as the man puts his faith in the Savior, he receives judicial forgiveness of all his sins. He will never have to pay the punishment for them in hell, because Christ has paid it all. The forgiven sinner now enters into a new relationship: God is no longer his Judge; now He is his Father.

So now we move into the home for an illustration of parental forgiveness. God is the Father and the believer is the child. In an unguarded moment, the child commits an act of sin. Then what happens? Does God sentence the child to die for the sin? Of course not, because God is no longer the Judge, but the Father! What does happen? Well, fellowship in the family is broken. The happy family spirit is gone. The child has not lost his salvation, but he has lost the joy of his salvation. Soon he may experience the discipline of his Father, designed to bring him back into fellowship. As soon as the child confesses his sin, he receives parental forgiveness.

Safety Certainty, and Enjoyment

If a believer, Why Not Sure of Salvation?
If saved, Why Not Happy?

Which Class Are YOU Traveling?

WHAT AN OFT-REPEATED QUESTION! Let me put it to you, my reader: for traveling you most certainly are — traveling from Time into Eternity and who knows how very, very near you may be at this moment to the GREAT TERMINUS?

Let me ask you then in all kindness, “Which class are you traveling?” There are but three. Let me describe them that you may put yourself to the test as in the presence of “Him with whom we have to do.”

First Class — Those who are saved and who know it. Second Class — Those who are not sure of salvation, but anxious to be sure. Third Class — Those who are not only unsaved, but totally indifferent about it.

Again I repeat my question — “Which class are you traveling?” Oh, the madness of indifference when eternal issues are at stake!

A short time ago, a man came rushing into the railway station and while scarcely able to gasp for breath took his seat in one of the carriages just on the point of starting.

“You’ve run it fine,” said a fellow-passenger.

“Yes,” replied he, breathing heavily after every two or three words, “but I’ve saved four hours, and that’s well worth running for.”

Am I Teachable?

The words of the Apostle Paul to Timothy are telling: "Let no man despise thy youth; but be thou an example of the believers, in word, in conversation, in charity, in spirit, in faith, in purity." (1 Tim 4:12). Apparently, Paul had reason to believe that there might be some who because of their advanced years would be reluctant to be taught by someone younger in the faith. Anticipating this, he admonishes his son in the faith to be an example to believers in more than just words, but in qualities befitting a servant of the Lord. The snare of thinking that we are beyond the point of teachability—for whatever reason—is a trap that can easily snag any of us. Perhaps it is because we have been a Christian for many years that we bristle at the thought of being corrected by someone other than ourselves. Or maybe because of those we associate with that we feel we are beyond instruction in a certain issue. Or maybe it is just a matter of simply refusing to admit that we are wrong—a lack of biblical understanding (and an abundance of spiritual pride!). For whatever reason, the excuses for not having an openness of heart and an attitude that is "easy to be entreated" (James 3:17) are difficult to justify in the light of Scripture—even though we may not be conscious of harboring these attitudes. The Bible is replete with examples of those who thought they were beyond teachability. The Pharisees scolded the man born blind who, after receiving his sight extolled the One who had opened his eyes. His clarion testimony only served to infuriate the proud Pharisees. Incensed, they chided "Thou wast altogether born in sins, dost thou teach us?" (v. 34).

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