Confession

Revive Us Again

Much has been written in the last fifteen years or so on the subject of "renewal" and "church growth." This has resulted in much division and discouragement because it has tended to turn our attention away from biblical principles. Instead it has turned our eyes to Madison Avenue hype, business management techniques, and pop-psychology. No one can deny the necessity of real revival and a resurgence of good gospel preaching. It should be noted that revival and gosp...

Your Own

As one thinks back to the days of his childhood, perhaps one of the earliest recollections was the thrill, pride and joy of personal owner-ship. To be able to say of a certain thing: “This is my very own, it belongs to me; and to nobody else!” The words: “I,” “me.’ ‘my,” and “mine,” were often upon our lips. We spoke of “my house,” “my dad.” “my mom,” “my toys,” “my bike,” etc. Nor is this pride of ownership lost as we grow older for, deep down within the personality of each individual, is the desire for something he can call his own It may be a wife, or husband, a home, a family, a car, or a business.

There are roughly two thousand nine hundred millions of human beings living on the earth today, yet each one of these persons is an individual, possessed of a personality which distinguishes him from every other person. Each possesses an intellect by which he is enabled to acquire, retain and reproduce knowledge; emotions, by which he reacts to what he sees, hears, smells, tastes and touches; and a will, by which he is enabled to determine on a course of action and carry it out. God respects this personality of man and never coerces it. God seeks to enlighten the intellect through the message He has given in His word, the Bible; to stir the emotions, as man’s need and God’s remedy is proclaimed, and to precipitate his will to a right decision concerning the way of salvation.

Three Questions

Undoubtedly this is the day of the questionnaire. Quiz programs were never so prevalent and popular as today. For several years one of the best known programs on the radio was called “Information Please.” It consisted of all sorts of questions being put to a team of experts, and their knowledge tested on a wide variety of subjects, at the expense of the company who sponsored the program. At other quiz programs, huge sums of money and valu able prizes are given away to those who are f...

Am I Teachable?

The words of the Apostle Paul to Timothy are telling: "Let no man despise thy youth; but be thou an example of the believers, in word, in conversation, in charity, in spirit, in faith, in purity." (1 Tim 4:12). Apparently, Paul had reason to believe that there might be some who because of their advanced years would be reluctant to be taught by someone younger in the faith. Anticipating this, he admonishes his son in the faith to be an example to believers in more than just words, but in qualities befitting a servant of the Lord. The snare of thinking that we are beyond the point of teachability—for whatever reason—is a trap that can easily snag any of us. Perhaps it is because we have been a Christian for many years that we bristle at the thought of being corrected by someone other than ourselves. Or maybe because of those we associate with that we feel we are beyond instruction in a certain issue. Or maybe it is just a matter of simply refusing to admit that we are wrong—a lack of biblical understanding (and an abundance of spiritual pride!). For whatever reason, the excuses for not having an openness of heart and an attitude that is "easy to be entreated" (James 3:17) are difficult to justify in the light of Scripture—even though we may not be conscious of harboring these attitudes. The Bible is replete with examples of those who thought they were beyond teachability. The Pharisees scolded the man born blind who, after receiving his sight extolled the One who had opened his eyes. His clarion testimony only served to infuriate the proud Pharisees. Incensed, they chided "Thou wast altogether born in sins, dost thou teach us?" (v. 34).

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