Character Study

Man's Diplomacy and God's Discipline (Jacob)

It is a remarkable fact, that Jacob is designated a "plain" or, as the word is elsewhere translated, "perfect" man (Gen 25: 27). The reference is, we believe, to the deep underlying current of life-purpose which characterized him. On the surface his life was marked by innumerable eddies and cross currents: no other of the patriarchs had so chequered a career as he. Yet the redeeming feature in his case was that from his early years he set his mind upon the Divine blessing connected with...

Kohath, Gershon, and Merari

I . - KOHATH. The book of Numbers is the history of the wilderness, the type of our journey through the world to the rest that remaineth for the people of God. It is preceded necessarily by Leviticus, in which first we learn what suits God in the sanctuary before we come out to practise it in the world. Leviticus is therefore the priest’s book, as Numbers is that of the Levites: both are types of Christians, who as priests have access to God where now His glory is for us displayed, and as Levi...

Chapter 6 - The Demoniac

(Mark v. 1—20.) "That which doth make manifest is light." The presence of Jesus in the world made manifest its true condition. The various forms of human wretchedness which met His eye and were ministered to by His hand, were not, in general, unwonted or exceptional forms. Each had its place, and each gave some distinctive feature to the picture of our poor fallen humanity as it lies around us at this very hour. And therein lies for us much of the blessedness of watching...

Chapter 5 - Rahab

A GOSPEL ADDRESS. (Joshua, chaps. ii. and vi.) We have here, beloved friends, a beautiful picture of a sinner saved by grace. Jericho is a type of the world. We know that the things that happened to Israel, as the apostle tells us, "happened unto them for types, and are written for our admonition upon whom the ends of the world have come." (I Cor. x. 11.) Jericho is a type of the world under doom from God - doom which is continually threatened by His word, which come...

While He Lingered

These words, "While he lingered," are some of the saddest and most convicting words you will find in Scripture. They are stated in reference to Lot when the city of Sodom was about to come under God’s judgment. We read, "then the angels hastened Lot, saying, Arise, take thy wife, and thy two daughters, which are here; lest thou be consumed in the iniquity of the city." (Gen. 19:15) A clearer warning of the impending doom of this city could not be given. The end had come, and all that...

Character Witnesses

The Bible's content is primarily historical. God has chosen to reveal Himself in the histories of men and women, nations and peoples. As they move across the stage of human history, our Bible follows them and comments on them from God's perspective, thus giving us a revelation of God and His ways with men. As history progresses from the beginning of time, we see God's purposes unfolding until, in the end of time, He is all and in all, and all glory and honor is given to...

The Gracious Editorial Ministry of God

When I was a college student, learning the fundamental principles of historical research and writing the need for editing in writing was stronger impressed upon me. One of my professors-who himself had authored several historical books and countless articles-maintained that even the best authors write numerous drafts. Many times I was grateful for conscientious proofreaders who made necessary corrections to my various research papers before the assignments were submitted to the merciless p...

The Age of Elijah and Elisha

The call of the notable prophet Elisha is most instructive for modern day Christians. What is the connection between a prophet who has been dead for almost 2,800 years and modern man? Our contemporary world is not much different from the conditions that prevailed during the lifetime of the aforementioned prophet. Elisha lived in a day when many of his kinsmen had apostatized and turned to idols. Likewise, in our day idolatry (be they literal icons of wood, stone, gold, and silver or more s...

Nicodemus: A Case Study

Being by birth a Jew and as such being entitled to all the privileges of a son of Abraham, it must have perplexed Nicodemus to be told that he must be born again to see the kingdom of God. This was a total setting aside of all his privileges and distinctions. A Pharisee, a ruler, a master, was not one whit nearer to this heavenly kingdom than the most disreputable. If he could carry all his advantages and distinctions with him, to have them placed to his credit in this new...

The Call of God - Abraham and Lot

 

The Call of God — Abraham and Lot.

Genesis 12.

C. H. Mackintosh.

In a day of such widely extended profession as the present, it is specially important that Christians should be deeply impressed with the necessity of realising personally the call of God, without which there can be no permanence or steadiness in the Christian course.

It is a comparatively easy thing to make a profession at a time when profession prevails; but it is never easy to walk by faith — it is never easy to give up present things, in the hope of "good things to come." Nothing but that mighty principle which the Apostle denominates "the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen" (Heb. 11: 1), can ever enable a man to persevere in a course which in a world where all is wrong — all out of order, must be thorny and difficult. We must feel "persuaded" of something yet to come — something worth waiting for — something that will reward all the toil of a pilgrim's protracted course, ere we rise up out of the circumstances of nature and the world, to "run with patience the race that is set before us" (Heb. 12: 1).

All this is fully exemplified in Abraham, and the exemplification receives additional force from the contrast exhibited in the character of Lot and others who are introduced in the course of the narrative.

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