Song of Solmon

The Song Of Songs

This Book takes up the Jew, or at least the remnant, in quite another aspect. It tells of the affections that the King can create in their heart, and by which He draws them to Himself. However strong these affections may be, they are not developed according to the position in which christian affections, properly so called, are formed. They differ in this respect. They do not possess the profound repose and sweetness of an affection that flows from a relationship already formed, known, and fu...

Preface To The Revised Edition

In revising Dr. Ironside’s Addresses on the Song of Solomon we have divided the text into chapters corresponding to those found in this book of the Old Testament. We hope this division will make it more compatible with methods used by today’s Bible student. No material was omitted, although it may seem to the reader that such is the case, especially in regard to the brevity of chapters 6 and 7. As Dr. Ironside wrote in the preface to the 1933 edition: The little volume now before the ...

Chapter 1

We will be glad and rejoice in thee, we will remember thy love more than wine (4), The first chapter divides itself into three parts. The first four verses give us the soul’s satisfaction; it is the expression of the bride’s delight in her bridegroom. She exclaims, “The song of songs, which is Solomon’s. Let him kiss me with the kisses of his mouth: for thy love is better than wine” (1-2). I remember a dear servant of God saying at one time, “I have sometimes wished there w...

Chapter 2

He brought me to the banqueting house, and his banner over me was love (4), The figure of the bride and the bridegroom is used very frequently in Scripture. In the Old Testament, Isaiah said, “As the bridegroom rejoiceth over the bride, so shall thy God rejoice over thee” (62:5). It is used of the church in the New Testament: “Christ also loved the church, and gave himself for it; That he might sanctify and cleanse it with the washing of water by the word” (Ephesians 5:25-26). And...

Chapter 3

I sought him whom my soul loveth; I sought him, but I found him not (1). The third chapter of this exquisite book is divided into two parts; the first comprises verses 1-5, and the second verses 6-11. The opening section sets before us interrupted and renewed communion. We are not told just what it was that had disturbed the fellowship of the lovers. It may have been the absence of the beloved, resulting in a temporary lethargic condition on the part of his espoused one. Possibly the e...

Chapter 4

Thou art all fair, my love; there is no spot in thee (7), It is not strange that as we think of our Lord Jesus Christ, the heavenly Bridegroom, our souls are moved to their deepest depths. But it is hard for us to realize that He has a greater love for us than we could ever possibly have for Him. And so here in this fourth chapter of the Song of Solomon, we hear the bridegroom expressing to his loved one the feelings of his heart toward her. As we read these words, as we listen to these h...

Chapter 5

I opened to my beloved; but my beloved had withdrawn himself, and was gone (6). In the first verse of chaper 5 we read the bridegroom’s immediate response to the bride’s invitation to enter his garden. This verse really belongs to the previous chapter. She no sooner says, “Come,” than he replies, “I am come into my garden, my sister, my spouse: I have gathered my myrrh with my spice; I have eaten my honeycomb with my honey; I have drunk my wine with my milk: eat, O friends; drin...

Chapters 6-7

I am my beloved’s, and my beloved is mine (6:3). As we look at these two chapters we are reminded that they are part of a larger section describing the interruption in the relationship between the bride and bridegroom, followed by the exultant reuniting of chapter 8. As chapter 5 closes, the bride, in search of her lover, is describing him in glorious terms. And when she thus praises him her friends turn again and say, “Whither is thy beloved gone, O thou fairest among women? whith...

Chapter 8

Many waters cannot quench love, neither can the floods drown it (7). Throughout this little book we have been tracing the evidence of the love of the bridegroom for his bride, from the time when the shepherd first looked on the shepherdess and his heart went out to her until the time when they were united in marriage. It is a beautiful picture, first of the love of Christ reaching us in our deep, deep need, and then the glorious union with Him, which will be consummated at the marriage su...

Author Biography

Henry Allan Ironside, one of the twentieth century’s greatest preachers, was born in Toronto, Canada, on October 14,1876. He lived his life by faith; his needs at crucial moments were met in the most remarkable ways. Though his classes stopped with grammar school, his fondness for reading and an incredibly retentive memory put learning to use. His scholarship was well recognized in academic circles with Wheaton College awarding an honorary LittD. in 1930 and Bob Jones University an hono...
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