Romans

Romans 13

The apostle next enters on the relation to worldly authority of the saints, after treating of their attitude toward all men as the witnesses of the good they had learnt in Christ, where God overcame all evil with His good, and privileges us as partakers of it both to be active in it and to suffer for it. “Let every soul be subject to authorities in power. For there is no authority save from God, and those that exist are ordered by God: so that he that setteth himself against the authori...

Romans 12

The apostle had set forth the doctrine of grace in atonement and salvation; he had shown in the resurrection of Christ the living link that binds together the justification of the believer with life, and hence with holiness of walk and heart — a link too often forgotten in the teaching, if not in the practice, of the children of God. He had reconciled the indiscriminate grace of God in the gospel with the ways of God and the special promises to Israel, and shown by the past, present, and f...

Romans 11

It was the prophet Isaiah then, after Moses, not Paul, who had distinctly pronounced Israel a rebellious people, spite of God’s daily pleading with them, and the call of the Gentiles who had not sought it. It was in vain to quarrel with the gospel on this score. The question is raised consequently whether Israel was wholly to lose their position in God’s favour according to promise. The apostle proves the contrary in this chapter. “I say then, Hath God cast away his people? Far be i...

Romans 10

The connection of the opening verses of Romans 10 with Romans 9 is full of instruction for the soul. To many a mind it may seem illogical; but this is only the narrowness and infirmity of man who is apt to reason from himself, not from the truth. God’s revelation affords the only sure basis; for He alone sees all sides of every object, He alone imparts the suitable affection and enables one to form the sound judgment. So here the apostle had refuted Jewish assumption of inalienable priv...

Romans

The circumstances under which the epistle to the Romans was written gave occasion to the most thorough and comprehensive unfolding, not of the church, but of Christianity. No apostle had ever yet visited Rome. There was somewhat as yet lacking to the saints there; but even this was ordered of God to call forth from the Holy Ghost an epistle which more than any other approaches a complete treatise on the fundamentals of Christian doctrine, and especially as to righteousness. Would we follo...

In the Spirit and the Spirit in you.

Lecture 7 - Rom. 8:1-27 There are two main parts of the subject tonight which it is of great consequence for the children of God to distinguish, in order that either one or other should be rightly understood. One is to be in the Spirit. It is a condition that supposes a total change of being; it means, in contrast with nature or the flesh, a new state which souls enter now on the earth. Besides, there is the actual personal dwelling of the Holy Ghost in the believer. This chapter most cle...

Matthew--Romans 7: Holy Spirit Ministry

Do not look for the churches experiences in the prophecies of Matthew, Mark and Luke. The Gospel of Matthew is the Gospel of the Kingdom. Christ is the prophet that should come. He shows them that the Temple must come down. He shows them the Spirit of the Law. Roman 7 is not the present experience of a Christian.  The first few verses show that—We are not in the flesh—and those that were and who were awakened by the Spirit of God—had this experience—Roman 8 Ye are not in t...

Romans Chapters 8-16

Chapter 8 "There is therefore now no condemnation to those which are in Christ Jesus" (chap. 8). He does not here speak of the efficacy of the blood in putting away sins (all-essential as that blood is, and the basis of all the rest), but of the new position entirely beyond the reach of everything to which the judgment of God applied. Christ had indeed been under the effect of the condemnation in our stead; but when risen He appears before God. Could there be a question there of sin, or...

Romans Chapters 1-7

Introduction The Epistle to the Romans is well placed at the head of all the others, as laying the foundations, in a systematic way, of the relations of man with God; reconciling at the same time this universal truth of man's position, first in responsibility, and secondly in grace, with the special promises made to the Jews. It also establishes the great principles of christian practice, the morality, not of man, but that which is the fruit of the light and revelation given by Christia...

Twice Broken - Romans 2

In chapter one of Romans the human heart was described as a dark place and dark thing: “their foolish heart was darkened.”  After laying the human heart wide open under the brilliant light of truth in chapter one, and exposing all the carnal corruptions hiding therein, Paul turns to us sitting in the gallery of the operating room (to those of us who are disgusted at the sight of all the blood and gore of sin) and with all the authority of a chief resident and spiritual cardio-vascul...
Syndicate content