Revelation

Chapter Eight The Breaking Of The Seventh Seal

Chapter 8 deals with the breaking of the seventh seal, which opens fully the book of title-deed to this world. This roll was put into the hands of the Lord Jesus by the Father after the church, represented by the glorified elders, was seen around the throne in Heaven (5:6-7). First let me make a few remarks in regard to the structure of the book of the Revelation. The main body of the book is divided into four sevens. There are the letters to the seven churches of Asia; then the seven sea...

Chapter Three The Seven Churches (Part Two)

We now go on to look at the next part in the marvelous series of this great annotated timetable of the church’s history. Church of Sardis (Revelation 3:1-6) Chapter 3 begins with the letter to the church of Sardis. Sardis means “a remnant,” or, “those who have escaped.” This name is very significant and tells its own story too plainly to be misunderstood. It brings before us, prophetically, the great state churches of the Reformation. These churches escaped from Rome, only to...

Chapter Two The Seven Churches (Part One)

We now turn to the letters addressed to the first four churches as found in Revelation 2. In the last chapter I tried to make it clear that the key to the structure of the book is found in Revelation 1:19. We have already studied the things that the apostle John had seen—that is, the first vision of the book where he beheld the glorified Lord in the midst of the lampstands. The third division is clearly indicated in the opening words of Revelation 4: “After [these things] I looked, and, ...

Introductory Notes by Arno C. Gaebelein

The Capstone This great final book of the Word of God may well be called the capstone of the entire Bible. A pyramid becomes a pyramid by the great capstone, and the Bible becomes the full and complete revelation of God through this document. If the Revelation were not in the Bible, the Bible would be an unfinished book; the issues raised in the preceding documents would be forever unsolved. The Authorship The title as we find it in the King James version is “The Revelation of St....

Chapter One The First Vision

Turning to verse one of the text, we note that the Revelation of Jesus Christ was given by the Father to the Son, as David revealed to Solomon all his plans in connection with the building of the future temple. God is represented as being in counsel with our Lord Jesus Christ concerning “things which must shortly come to pass.” It is the joy of His heart to communicate this knowledge to His servants. An angel became the messenger to make all known to the beloved apostle John. Note then t...

Author's Introduction

It is regrettable that to so many Christians the book of Revelation seems to be a sealed book. That is not what God intended. The book of Daniel was to be sealed until the time of the end (Daniel 12:9), but of Revelation it is written: “Seal not the sayings of the prophecy of this book: for the time is at hand” (22:10, italics added). It is clearly evident that this portion of Holy Scripture was given for our instruction and edification, yet thousands of the Lord’s people permit themselves to be robbed of blessing by ignoring it.

Significantly enough, the book of Revelation begins and ends with a blessing pronounced on those who read and keep what is written therein (1:3; 22:7). Surely God did not mean to mock us by promising a blessing on all who keep what they cannot hope to understand! Only unbelief would so reason. Faith delights to appropriate every part of the sacred record and finds that “they are all plain to him that understandeth” (Proverbs 8:9).

The true title is given in the opening verse. It is “The Revelation of Jesus Christ” not “The Revelation of St. John the Divine.” There is no authority for this latter designation and it shows all too plainly how far some early editor had slipped away from basic principles. John was a saint as all believers are saints. He was not a divine! Such a title would have amazed him beyond measure. Nor is the book the revelation of John or of any other servant of God. It is the revelation of Jesus Christ Himself.

Preface To The Revised Edition

H. A. Ironside’s commentary on Revelation was first published in 1920. As might be expected in an exposition of prophetic Scripture, the author examined Bible prophecy in the light of then-current events and wove his observations into the commentary. Decades later some readers find certain of these references a bit puzzling. During preparation of this revised edition we considered the possibility of eliminating or modifying observations that might be considered particularly dated. Ultim...

Outline Of The Book Of Revelation

I. “The Things Which Thou Hast Seen” (1:1-20) A. Introduction (1:1-8) B. The Vision of the Son of Man (1:9-20) II. “The Things Which Are” (2:1-3:22) A. The Church of Ephesus (2:1 -7) B. The Church of Smyrna (2:8-11) C. The Church of Pergamos (2:12-17) D. The Church of Thyatira (2:18-29) E. The Church of Sardis (3:1-6) F. The Church of Philadelphia (3:7-13) G. The Church of Laodicea (3:14-22) III. “The Things Which Shall Be” (4...

Chapter Nine The First And Second Trumpets Of Woe

This chapter will examine the fifth and sixth trumpets, known respectively as the first and second woes. The added designation of these trumpets implies a solemnity and a fearfulness beyond anything we have previously considered. The Delusions of the First Woe (Revelation 9:1-12) Instead of “I saw a star fall from heaven,” a better translation would be, “I saw a star fallen from heaven.” The reference is undoubtedly to that star, symbolizing an apostate leader, referred to unde...

Chapter Nineteen The Two Suppers

In the opening verses of Revelation 19 we are given another look into Heaven and permitted to note the exultation caused by the judgment of the great harlot. Rejoicing of the Saints (Revelation 19:1-5) All the redeemed of every age, who when on earth knew something of this awful power of iniquity, will then rejoice that the harlot is forever overthrown. This is the last time the twenty-four elders are seen in the book. The symbol changes in the next section, and the bride, the Lamb’s...
Syndicate content