Proverbs

Proverbs 5

Additional instruction is given in Proverbs 5 concerning the strange woman warned against in Chapter 2. It is a solemn subject if this dangerously seductive woman pictures false religion with its snares and allurements. Even in its simple, primary meaning, this admonition is of great importance. If any are entrapped, it is not for lack of warning, but for willful neglect of instruction. 5:1-2 Throughout the book of Proverbs, the need for more than casual attention to the words of wisdo...

Proverbs 6

Even the unregenerate would avoid many failures if they followed the instruction of this chapter in their lives and their businesses. 6:1-5 Pledging security for another has been the downfall of many who might have been comfortable and prosperous otherwise. In these verses the one trapped in this way is urged to deliver himself if possible, before the penalty has to be paid. Unlikely as it may seem on the surface, pride is generally the incentive to offering security. A desire to be...

Proverbs 8

This meditation on Wisdom’s ways is a welcome relief from the folly and sin described in the previous chapter. This is especially true when the anointed eye discerns that wisdom as the uncreated Word, the Lord Jesus Christ, the Wisdom of God! Although the feminine form is used throughout, it is clear that in the latter part of the chapter it is Jesus who is before us. 8:1-7 Wisdom does not wait for men to seek her. She seeks to draw the simple from paths of error to the temple of kno...

Proverbs 7

Only God can correctly estimate the depravity of the human heart. He knows its perverseness and the need for continued warning. Therefore this entire chapter continues with the subject that we have been considering. The strange woman’s ways and behavior are graphically delineated to save the youth from her snare. If he chooses to follow her now, he does so with his eyes fully opened. 7:1-5 Constant dwelling on the Word of God preserves from sin. Notice that the Word is to be bound an...

Proverbs

Proverbs 1

Beyond all others, David was the sweet Psalmist of Israel, though not a few worthy companions find a place in the divine collection of holy lyrics. Solomon stands in like pre-eminence for the utterance of the sententious wisdom of which the book of Proverbs is the chief expression, with Ecclesiastes when the sense of his own failure under unique circumstances of creature advantage gave a sad and penitent character to his experience in the power of the inspiring Spirit. It is the more striking when compared with the Song of Songs, which shows us the Jewish spouse restored to the love of the once-despised Messiah, and His adorable excellency and grace, after her long folly, manifold vicissitudes, and sore tribulation.

Every one of these compositions is stamped with the design of inspiration, and instinct with the power of the Holy Spirit in carrying out His design in each. But they are all in view of man on the earth, more especially the chosen people of God, passing through the vista of sin and shame and sorrow in the latter day to the kingdom which the true Son of David, the born Son of God (Ps. 2), will establish as Jehovah’s King in His holy hill of Zion, though far larger and higher things also, as we know. Hence these writings have a common governmental character, only that, in the Psalms especially, the rejection and the sufferings of Christ give occasion to glimpses of light above and to hints of brighter associations. But the full and proper manifestation of heavenly things was left for the rejected Christ to announce in the gospels, and for the Holy Spirit sent down from on high to open out practically in the Acts, and doctrinally in the epistles, especially of the Apostle Paul. Any unfolding of a church character, or even of Christian relationship, it would be vain to look for in these constituent books or any others of the Old Testament.

Proverbs

 Introduction The Book of Proverbs gives us the application of that wisdom which created the heavens and the earth to the details of life in this world of confusion and evil. This thought brings out the immensity of grace unfolded here. God deigns to apply His wisdom to the circumstances of our practical life, and to shew us, with His own intelligence, the consequences of all the ways in which man may walk. For it is often in the way of knowledge, not of precept, that the statements ...

Straight Face - Proverbs 17:22

“A merry heart doeth good like a medicine”  Prov. 17:22  There are three theories about what makes us laugh.  There is the superiority theory suggested by Plato, the incongruity theory, and the relief theory suggested by Freud.  Laughter is a mystery.  Laughter is an emotional and psychological reflex that God has downloaded with our original software.  Animals don’t laugh.  They might screech, or yelp or even jump up and down in their cage while they ...

Lecture 6 - The Psalm-Books, Gospels, and Acts

The Psalm-Books We are now, beloved brethren, to examine that division of the Old Testament which stands last in all Hebrew Bibles, and last in our Lord's words in the last chapter of Luke, "the law of Moses, the prophets, and the psalms." He does not use indeed the Jewish term for this last division, which was called by the Jews (vaguely enough), "the writings," or "Scriptures," - Kethubim; and we have no certain proof that He meant to speak of more than the actual book of P...

Swallow That Gossip

"He that answereth a matter before he heareth it, it is folly and shame unto him." Prov. 18:13 Is passing judgment upon others ever the duty of a Christian? Never, if it is prejudgment. If you come up with a verdict before hearing all the facts of a case, then face it, you are prejudiced. If you only investigate one side of the question, you are guilty of prejudiced investigation, which is twisting the truth. Folly and shame are your rewards. If you have shown haste an...

Dangers in Leadership

The following was first given as a message at the May, 1999 Elders and Workers Conference in Markham, Ontario. In my travels among the assemblies it is evident that the general spiritual condition of many of them is poor. Attendance is often a small portion of those who would claim to be in fellowship. Worldliness has made inroads and it is manifested in a lack of commitment to the local assembly and a strong commitment to careers, hobbies, sports, and recreation. ...
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