Philippians

Chapter 3

In this chapter the apostle traces the path of the believer as in chapter 2 he traces the path of Christ. Verse 1.—“To write the same thing.” He had written about the Lord Jesus being in the form of God, then about Him coming down and becoming obedient unto death. Now he is about to shew the path of the believer in following Christ. “The same thing” in the Christian as in Christ. How closely this associates our path with His? “To me indeed is not grevious”— as if it would ...

Chapter 2

The opening words of this chapter are intimately connected with what has gone before. “If there be therefore any consolation.” “Therefore” shows that the suffering and consolation are linked together. What a motive for endurance and bearing up in the fight! “Consolation in Christ”—“comfort of love”—“fellowship of the Spirit”—“bowels and mercies”—what an array of beautiful things! The words “If any” are four times found. What an appeal to the heart! Would t...

Chapter 1

Chapter 1 Verse 1.—“Paul and Timotheus the servants of Jesus Christ.” Not “Paul an Apostle” here as in other Epistles, but associating himself with Timothy who had been with him at Philippi when first the gospel was preached there (Acts 16:3), and was now with him at Rome. “To the saints in Christ Jesus.” The saints first, the servants next. Our highest privilege is as saints: we can get no higher than that. Saints by the call of God (Rom. 1:7), not by our attainments or ...

Chapter 2

The opening words of this chapter are intimately connected with what has gone before. “If there be therefore any consolation.” “Therefore” shows that the suffering and consolation are linked together. What a motive for endurance and bearing up in the fight! “Consolation in Christ”—“comfort of love”—“fellowship of the Spirit”—“bowels and mercies”—what an array of beautiful things! The words “If any” are four times found. What an appeal to the heart! Would t...

Introduction

(From Notes Supplied by Mr. R. Lundin Brown). Kilmarnock: John Ritchie, Publisher of Christian Literature By employing the Apostle Paul to write the seven Epistles to churches gathered from among the Gentiles, the Holy Ghost evidently means us to keep all the truth together; learning, and making use of the whole. Not taking a part and leaving the rest, or occupying ourselves with one side to the exclusion of the others. A living Christ as the centre, the rallying-point, and all God

Galatians - Colosians

The Epistle To The Galatians. The changes in this brief Epistle need not occupy us long. In Gal. 1:6 the present force is properly given, “ye are so quickly removing” (not “removed”), and “in” (not “into”) the grace of Christ, and of course, “unto a different [not “another”] gospel:” a very considerable correction of mere renderings, and long known to be necessary, for a single verse. So also the slight shade of distinction between “should preach” in verse 8 an...

The Free Service of Christians

1 Cor. 15:15, 16; 2 Cor. 4:13; Phil. 1:14-17; Col. 2:19.

A Letter to the Irish. Or the so-called “Lay Preachers.”

Dear brethren,

My attention has been directed to the leading article in the Achill Missionary Herald, No. 332, January 10,1865. This paper deals with three classes of correspondents: first, “those who consider lay preaching as altogether unlawful;” secondly, “those who disapprove of it as a system, but who think that circumstances may warrant the occasional use of it;” and thirdly, “those who regard it with unconditional approval, and who do not entertain a suspicion that it can be productive of anything but the happiest results.”

First. The author of the article refers to a tract on “Lay Preachers” for proofs of the untenableness of the first position. He justly argues (from Acts 8:4; Acts 11:21; Revelation 22:17) that all believers may, and should make known the gospel to others, privately or in public, when they have the opportunity. Besides the necessity there may be for such preaching, he remarks “that there is not a single instance in the Old or New Testament of any one having been prohibited from preaching.” This witness is true — mark it well.

Philippians

Philippians 1

Let us seek, with the blessing of God, to develop a little the special features of this epistle on which we now enter. For the better understanding of what comes before us, we may also compare its character with that of others. Some of its features may be gathered from the very first verse. The Apostle introduces himself in the simplest possible manner: “Paul and Timotheus, the servants of Jesus Christ, to all the saints in Christ Jesus which are at Philippi, with the bishops and deacons; grace be unto you and peace from God our Father and from the Lord Jesus Christ.” Elsewhere, even if he presents himself as a servant, he does not fail also to add his apostolic title, or some other distinction by which God had separated him from the rest of his brethren. But here it is not so. He is led of the Holy Ghost to present himself upon the broadest ground to the children of God in Philippi; on this he could fully associate Timotheus with himself. Thus we may gather from the very start of the epistle that we are not to look for the wonderful unfoldings of Christian and Church truth, such as we have in Romans, Corinthians, or Ephesians, where the apostleship of Paul is most carefully stated.

Philipians

There is no epistle in the New Testament which gives so little space to the development of. doctrine as this to the Philippians. Need it be said that it has not the less its own proper office on that account? And what is this but the unfolding of the truth in the heart and in the ways of the Christian? Hence it is that, although doctrine is sparse, if not almost excluded, nevertheless what little appears comes in as ancillary to the main purpose. It is interwoven with practical appeal, and i...

Philippians

Introduction In the epistle to the Philippians we find much more of christian experience, and the development of the exercise of the heart, than in the generality of the epistles. It is in fact proper christian experience. Doctrine and practice are found in them all, but, with the exception of the second to Timothy which is of another nature, there is none that contains like this, the expression of the Christian's experience in this toilsome life, and the resources which are open to him in ...
Syndicate content