Nehemiah

The Building of the Wall and the Gates

In Nehemiah 2, 3 and 12, we read about several gates that have symbolic meaning for the reconstruction of the temple walls as Israel returned from her captivity. Let us look at how this building took place and under what circumstances.  First, in Nehemiah 2:9-20, Nehemiah arrives in Jerusalem.  He rests for three days, and while resting physically, he is greatly exercised spiritually.  In other words, “he conferred not with flesh and blood,” rather He only meets with the Lord and is filled by His presence at first.  (See Nehemiah 2:12 and Galatians 1:16)  

Prefatory Note for Nehemiah

The little book now before the reader has been in contemplation ever since its companion-exposition, “Notes on the Book of Ezra,” was published. If read in connection with that work and also the writer’s “Notes on Esther” (the three issued separately, also in one volume), and the “Notes on Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi” in the volume on “The Minor Prophets,” a connection will be traced throughout.

As heretofore, no attempt has been made to write for scholars or to produce a literary work. But in the simplest way, I have sought to emphasize important truths that are being neglected in many places where they need to be pressed more insistently than ever.

The Lord watch over all for His name’s sake.

H. A. Ironside
Needles, Cal.,
Nov., 1913

Notes On The Book Of Nehemiah, Second Edition

By H. A. Ironside

Loizeaux Brothers
New York

Preface To The Second Edition

In going over these pages again after the lapse of nearly twelve years I feel more than ever the importance of the truths on which they insist. The need for holy separation from the world and worldly Christianity is more evident with each passing day, as the dispensation nears its close. On the other hand the need of increasing largeness of heart toward God’s beloved people struggling against the evil and crying for light and for help becomes more manifest. To all such I send forth this little book again on its mission of love.

H. A. Ironside
June, 1925

Prefatory Note

The little book now before the reader has been in contemplation ever since its companion-exposition, “Notes on the Book of Ezra,” was published. If read in connection with that work and also the writer’s “Notes on Esther” (the three issued separately, also in one volume), and the “Notes on Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi” in the volume on “The Minor Prophets,” a connection will be traced throughout.

As heretofore, no attempt has been made to write for scholars or to produce a literary work. But in the simplest way I have sought to emphasize important truths that are being neglected in many places where they need to be pressed more insistently than ever.

The Lord watch over all for His name’s sake.

H. A. Ironside
Nov. 1913

Nehemiah

The Book of Nehemiah will require but few remarks; but it is important to establish its import. It is a necessary link in the history of God’s dealings, in the recital of His patience and loving-kindness towards Jerusalem, which He had chosen. In Ezra we have seen the temple rebuilt and the authority of the law re-established among the people, who are again separated from the Gentiles, and set apart for God. In Nehemiah we witness the rebuilding of the walls of Jerusalem, and the res...

Lecture on the Book of Nehemiah

Nehemiah 1

The book we enter upon tonight gives us the last view of the people of God in the Old Testament as far as their history is concerned; hence, it has a very deep interest for us. It is the last time for the Jew; as we are now called out in the last time for God’s people here below. That last time for us began, as we know, before the last apostle was taken away, that God might give us distinctive, definite, divine instruction; not merely a sober and sound judgment drawn from Scripture, but that the Holy Ghost might be able to tell us distinctly that it is the last time. Thus we may see most clearly the strong analogy on the surface of it between the words that were spoken about Israel in those days and the position which the goodness of God has given to us now. I do not say this to set our imagination at work, but that we may gather the instruction which the Holy Ghost has given us — that which He tells us of the remnant that had returned, and of their state.

There is a considerable difference in the tone between the Book of Ezra and that of Nehemiah. Ezra shows us the remnant returning from Babylon and first gathering together in Jerusalem — in the land. The Book of Nehemiah shows us the same remnant at a later epoch — the last that Scripture shows us historically. Malachi, no doubt, falls in with Nehemiah, just as Zechariah and Haggai move with Ezra. Haggai and Zechariah were some time before Malachi. These will enable us, therefore, to connect the prophecy of these books of Scripture with the history.

Nehemiah

 Introduction The Book of Nehemiah will require but few remarks; but it is important to establish its import. It is a necessary link in the history of God's dealings, in the recital of His patience and loving-kindness towards Jerusalem, which He had chosen. In Ezra we have seen the temple rebuilt and the authority of the law re- established among the people, who are again separated from the Gentiles, and set apart for God. In Nehemiah we witness the rebuilding of the walls of J...

Lecture 4 - The Bible Books: Their Arrangement and Relationship

We are now to take up the Bible as a whole, beloved brethren, to study the form in which it has come into our hands, and its parts, and the relation of these to each other and the whole. Is it a complete organic unity? Is there nothing defective, nothing redundant? There are other books mentioned in Scripture itself, as the book of Jasher, the book of the wars of the Lord, and others: are these books which perhaps have fallen out and are lost out of the canon? If so, can we ...

The Church Age

Excerpt from The Church Truth Series Many Christians do not understand where the Church fits in God’s time table. Many confuse the New Testament Church with the nation of Israel in the Old Testament. As a result many bring Old Testament law and principles into the New Testament Church. This leads to great confusion and error. It is very important that we see the clear distinction between the Church and Israel. The Bible clearly teaches us that the New Testament C...

No Fellowship with Dishonour to Christ

No Fellowship with Dishonour to Christ. Section 5 of: Musings on Scripture Vol. 3 J. G. Bellett. I refuse the language used by brethren from whom we have seceded, that we have "excommunicated them." This is not a just expression; and it produces indignation, and immediate determination in the mind to have nothing to do with people or with principles of such a bearing. It is not excommunication. It is standing at the door of the house of God, and, if certain persons come to the door seeking ...
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