Mark

Mark 16

Cf. “Introductory Lectures,” pp. 231-240. Mark 16:1-8. Matt. 28:1-8; Luke 24:1-11; John 20:1-10. The resurrection not only witnesses the power of death overcome and the perfect condition of man before God, suitable to heaven, but, as regards things here below, it is for him that believes the true solvent of all difficulties. Jesus never was vindicated thoroughly till the resurrection. There was, of course, a rich and mighty testimony before; but it was one which might be gainsai...

Mark 15

(Isa. 53:3) Mark 15:1-5. Matt. 27:1-14; Luke 23:1-4; John 18:28. Next follows the consultation in the morning, after the Lord had been already condemned to “be guilty of death.” The result is that the chief priests, the elders, the scribes, the whole council, and, indeed, the whole people consenting, agreed to deliver Jesus to Pilate, the representative of the civil power. Jesus must be condemned by man in every capacity — the religious and civil — the Jews, under the name ...

Mark 14

Cf. “Introductory Lectures,” p. 230 Mark 14:1-11. Matt. 26:1-16; Luke 22:1-6; John 12:1-8. We have here a supper at Bethany and a supper at Jerusalem: one of them simply a supper in the house of those whom Jesus loved; the other a new thing instituted at the Paschal feast,137 which it was to set aside, while for the Church it was to be the standing memorial of the Lord Jesus that should follow. But these two suppers have a very weighty place, the death of the Lord Jesus Chris...

Mark 13

Cf. “Introductory Lectures,” p. 229 f., and see note 126. Mark 13:1-13. Matt. 24:1-14; Luke 21:5-19. In the succinct account which Mark gives us of the prophetic discourse of our Lord on the Mount of Olives,126 and of the questions that led to it, we have the favoured hearers specified more particularly than elsewhere: Peter, James, John, and Andrew. Mark is characterized by this minuteness of detail, although his is much the shortest of the Gospels. The Lord, in answer to t...

Mark 12

Cf. “Introductory Lectures,” pp. 227-229. Mark 12:1-12. Matt. 21:33-46; Luke 20:9-19. He parable with which this chapter opens sets forth in a few plain words, and in highly pregnant touches, the moral history of Israel as under the dealings of God. In what follows we have the various classes of Israel successively exposing themselves, while they were attempting to perplex the Lord. They thought to judge Him; the result was, they were themselves judged. But in the parable with ...

Mark 11

Mark 11:1-11. Matt. 21:1-11; Luke 19:28-40; John 12:12-16. The Saviour now proceeds on His last journey to Jerusalem, His final presentation of Himself, as far as testimony went, is the Messiah. His prophetic task had been accomplished and refused; the great work of atonement lay yet before Him. Between the two comes His royal progress, we may call it, to the city of the Great King. Nevertheless, as He was the predicted Prophet like unto Moses, and yet never man spake like this man; a...

Mark 10

Cf. “Introductory Lectures,” pp. 214-227. Mark 10:1-12. Matt. 19:1-9. Our Lord now starts on His last journey, leaving Galilee for the borders of Judea and the other side98 of the Jordan.102 When crowds resort to Him, He, as He was wont, again taught. And full of moral value and Divine light His teaching is. May our souls weigh it well! We are apt to be one-sided. If we seize the special manifestation of God’s grace, we are apt to over look, neglect, or enfeeble the great and ...

Preface

Edited, with additions, by E. E. Whitfield. Elliot Stock, 1907 (See “Appendix” towards the end of this series for more notes on the book of Mark. The numbers throughout this series that are not super-scripted refer to the notes on the Appendix page.) “The Son of man did not come to be ministered to, but to minister.” Preface Lectures on the Second Gospel, by the late Mr. W. Kelly, for fifty years editor of the Bible Treasury, passed through that magazine in the years 1...

Mark

Mark 1 - 8. It is remarkable how tradition has contrived to injure the truth in touching the question of the method of the gospel we now enter on; for the current view which comes down to us from the ancients, stamped too with the name of one who lived not long after the apostles, lays down — that Mark’s is that gospel which arranges the facts of our Lord’s life, not in, but out of the order of their occurrence. Now, that order is precisely what he most observes. And this mistake, i...

Chapter 5 - The Gospel Miracles

Before we leave the Gospels, something ought to be said about the miracle stories which are found in them. Anyone who attempts to answer the question which forms the title of this book must recognize that for many readers it is precisely these miracle-stories which are the chief difficulty in the way of accepting the New Testament documents as reliable. To some extent it is true to say that the credibility of these stories is a matter of historical evidence. If they are related by author...
Syndicate content