Mark

Mark 6

Cf. “Introductory Lectures,” pp. 181-188. Mark 6:1-6. Matt. 13:53-58; cf. Luke 4:16-30. There are three divisions I would make in the portion before us, in order to examine it more conveniently: First, the unbelieving rejection of Christ in “His own country55”; secondly, the mission of the Twelve; thirdly, the power — yet, alas! fatal weakness, withal — of an unpurged conscience, as illustrated in King Herod’s behaviour to John the Baptist. First, the unwearied Ser...

Mark 5

Cf. “Introductory Lectures,” pp. 173-181. Mark 5:1-20. Matt. 8:28-34; Luke 8:26-39. We have still an unfolding of the service of Jesus. In this chapter it is not simply the ministration of the word, with its various hindrances and measures of success as far as God is pleased to work both in quickening power and fruitfulness, and this to the end. Neither is it a picture of the tempest-tossed condition of the disciples, Jesus with them, meanwhile, in their dangers, but apparently ...

Mark 4

Cf. “Introductory Lectures,” pp. 168-173. Mark 4:1-20. Matt. 13:1-23; Luke 8:4-15. The Lord Jesus had been announced as the Messiah by His forerunner, had manifested Himself fully as such, so that all were responsible, from the chief authorities down to the people at large. The last chapter showed what the result would be — the crowning testimony of the Spirit rejected as well as the Son of man in person, the unpardonable sin of that rebellious and apostate race, and the form...

Mark 3

Mark 3:1-6. Matt. 12:9-14; Luke 6:6-11. Jesus is in the synagogue upon another Sabbath Day, and there was a man there which had a withered hand, and they watched Him whether He would heal him on the Sabbath Day, that they might accuse Him. How remarkable it is that Satan gets an instinctive sense of what the Lord was going to do. Satan outwits himself in his servants by expecting good from the Lord and the Lord’s people. This is a remarkable thing. Again, if you find a child of God ...

Mark 2

Cf. “Lectures on Gospels,” pp. 156-161. Mark 2:1-12. Matt. 9:1-8; Luke 5:17-26. After an interval spent in desert places with such as flocked to Him by the fame which kept Him from any city, we find our Lord once more in Capernaum; and at once crowds besiege, not the house only, but the very door, to hear the word He was speaking. Alas, Capernaum! wert thou not exalted to heaven? Art thou not brought down to hell? The mighty works done in thee were less mighty than the Word whic...

Mark 1

Cf. “Introductory Lectures on the Gospels,” pp. 140-156. Mark 1:1-18. Cf. Matt. 3:1-11; Luke 3:1-17; John 1:19-30. Mark gives us the ministry of the Lord. His account is brief; and there are few events which are not recorded by Matthew and Luke. Nevertheless, what a gap there would be in our view of the Saviour’s life and work here below if we hid not Mark! In none have we a more characteristic manner of presenting what is given us. In none have we such graphic, vivid life-to...

Introduction

§1. Biographical Mark (Marcus) was a common Roman praenomen. His Jewish name was John.1 He was converted through Peter (1 Peter 5:13; cf. Acts 12:12).2 At the very outset of his Christian course Barnabas (his relation) and Paul took him with them on their missionary travels (Acts 12:25, Acts 13:5). John Mark had that light idea of the responsibility of Christian service which is so common: he thought he could take up and put down God’s work as he liked, and he left the two leaders to g...

Mark 8

Cf. “Introductory Lectures,” pp. 190-194. Mark 8:1-9. Matt. 15:32-39. In the second miracle of the feeding of the multitude we have, of course, a repeated testimony to Christ as the Messiah, the Shepherd of Israel, viewed in the beneficence of His power. It was, indeed, no more than what is predicted of Him “I will abundantly bless her provision; I will satisfy her poor with bread.” This was a very significant token to Israel. In the case of other rulers there is a natur...

Mark 9

Cf. “Introductory Lectures,” pp. 195-214. Mark 9:2-13. Matt. 17:1-13; Luke 9:28-36. Let us remark that those selfsame witnesses He takes and leads up “on a high mountain apart by themselves,” whom afterwards (Mark 14) He takes with Him to Gethsemane. What a change from the glories of the one scene to the exceeding sorrow unto death of the other! Yet was the connection close, and the, end of the Lord full of tenderness to His own: even as the mention of His rejection and dea...

Appendix

Notes by E. E. Whitfield. Notes on the Introduction § 1. Mark, although he may have been (as Birks thought, p. 235) a Roman Christian on his father’s side, was doubtless maternally a Hebrew (Palestinian) Christian (Acts 12:12). Cf. the Aramaic surname of his cousin Joseph (Acts 4:36). Hence the Greek used by him would have, as we find, an Aramaic tinge about it. Very noticeable is the frequency with which he gives Aramaic words. At Mark 6:15, Mark 8:14, Mark 10:22, Mark 14:8, Ma...
Syndicate content