Mark

The Rich Young Ruler

Mark 10

Let us look at the parable of the rich young ruler in Mark 10:17-22. This classic parable reveals a young man coming to Jesus in a hurry. He comes running to Jesus as a serious and sincere seeker, kneeling reverently at the Savior’s feet. It seems as though he is close to being saved, asking Jesus, “Good Teacher, what shall I do that I may inherit eternal life?” (Mark 10:17) But when Jesus commands him, “Go your way, sell whatever you have and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; and come, take up the cross, and follow me,” this young man goes away sorrowful at the thought of losing his great many possessions. (Mark 10:21-22) At the last minute, he does not believe and turns his back on Jesus.

New Testament (Matthew-John)

Lesson 133: Christ In The Old Testament
Luke 24:44-48; John 5:31-37
Golden Texts John 5:39

The Old Testament is devoted to the prophetic revelation of One Person—Christ; and the exposition of one theme—Redemption. Hebrews 10:7; Luke 24:27; John 5:39.

The Lord Jesus Christ is revealed in many ways in the O. T., but chiefly by prophecy and type.

I. Prophesied. There are 333 distinct prophecies concerning: Christ in the O. T., many of which have been fulfilled and others yet to be fulfilled.

1. As a Man. Genesis 3:15; Galatians 4:4. Note it is “the seed of the woman, not the man,” i.e., the virgin birth.

2. Of Shem. Genesis 9:26. He was to be of the Shemetic or Semetic race.

3. The Nation. Abraham. Genesis 12:1-3; 22:18.

4. The Tribe—Judah. Genesis 49:10; cp. Revelation 5:5; Hebrews 7:14.

5. The family—David. 2 Samuel 7:11; Jeremiah 23:5, 6, Isaiah 11:1, 2; Matthew 1:6; 22:42-46.

6. The Town. Micah 5:2; Matthew 2:4-6.

7. The Person. Luke 1:30-33; Isaiah 9:6.

8. The Day. Luke 2:11. Cp. Daniel 9:24-27. This coincides to the exact day when Christ made His triumphal entry into Jerusalem. See Sir Robert Anderson’s, “The Coming- Prince.”

9. Manner of birth. Isaiah 7:14; 1 Timothy 3:16. He was to be virgin-born.

10. Manner of Life. Isaiah 53:1-3.

11. Manner of Work. Isaiah 42:1, 2; 6, 7; 61:1.

12. Rejection. Isaiah 49:5-7; Isaiah 53:5, 6.

13. Manner of death. Daniel 9:25; Isaiah 53:8; Psalm 22:7.

14. Purpose of death. Psalm 22:22-27; Daniel 9:24; Isaiah 53:6.

Mark

The Gospel according to Mark has a character that differs in certain respects from all the others. Each Gospel, as we have seen, has its own character; each is occupied with the Person of the Lord in a different point of view: as a divine Person, the Son of God; as the Son of man; as the Son of David, the Messiah presented to the Jews, Emmanuel. But Mark is occupied with none of these titles. It is the Servant we find here—and in particular His service as bearing the word—the active serv...

Chapter One The Servant Begins His Ministry

John Prepares the Crowds (Mark 1:1-13) Mark began his record very abruptly as he introduced the Servant of Jehovah, and then told us in a very few words of His forerunner and of His baptism and temptation. “The gospel of Jesus Christ” is God’s good news concerning His blessed Son who came into this world to reveal His heart to mankind and to offer Himself as the great sin offering for our redemption. Malachi had predicted the coming of the messenger who was to precede the Lord an...

Author's Introduction

It is interesting to notice the differing emphases of the Holy Spirit in His presentation of our blessed Lord Jesus Christ in each of the four Gospels. In them we have four portraits of our Savior. The Gospel of Matthew sets Him forth as the King, the Messiah of Israel—hence the genealogy proving Him to be the Son of David and Son of Abraham. This also accounts for the many references to and quotations from the Old Testament Scriptures found in Matthew. The Gospel of Luke presents Him as the perfect man, the unique Son of man who came to seek and to save the lost. A singular feature of Luke’s record is that of the table talk of Jesus. Is there any function better than a dinner party for allowing a man to relax and open up his heart? And in Luke we see our Lord on many such occasions. The book of Luke traces His genealogy back to Adam through Heli, the father of Mary and hence the father-in-law of Joseph (Luke 3:23). The Gospel of John tells us plainly his object was to show “that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God; and that believing ye might have life through his name” (John 20:31). John’s account shows that He is the eternal Word who became flesh for our redemption.

Introductory Notes by Arno C. Gaebelein

The Evangelists The Gospel of Mark is the briefest of the four Gospels. The traditional view, which holds that the apostle Peter dictated this record and that Mark was only an amanuensis, has been proven erroneous. Equally incorrect are other theories: the Gospel of Mark was written first and Matthew and Luke copied some material from it; or there was an original record, a common source, that all the Evangelists used. All these opinions are mostly the inventions of men who disbelieve the ...

Chapter Two The Work Of The Divine Servant Part One

Healing of the Palsied Man (Mark 2:1-12) The Lord’s early Galilean ministry was still in progress, the events of Mark 2 following closely upon those of Mark 1. Capernaum was the center from which Jesus worked out to other parts of Galilee in the early summer or late spring of a.d. 28. The presence of Jesus in any particular place soon became known, as on this occasion when the word went out that the great healer was again in the city that He had chosen for His home. Crowds filled the...

Matthew - John

The Gospel According To St. Matthew. The first thing that strikes the mind, as undesirable in an accurate version of the Scriptures, is, that words supplied by the translators, which have no counterpart in the original, should not be designated as such by italics as attempted more or less fully in the Authorised Bible. Dr. Scrivener’s Cambridge Paragraph Bible sought this more systematically, and therefore is happier in this respect. In the Revised New Testament, on the contrary, the in...

Matthew - John

The Gospel According To St. Matthew. The first thing that strikes the mind, as undesirable in an accurate version of the Scriptures, is, that words supplied by the translators, which have no counterpart in the original, should not be designated as such by italics as attempted more or less fully in the Authorised Bible. Dr. Scrivener’s Cambridge Paragraph Bible sought this more systematically, and therefore is happier in this respect. In the Revised New Testament, on the contrary, th...

Mark 7

Cf. “Introductory Lectures,” pp. 188-190. See also note 66. Mark 7:1-23. Matt. 15:1-20. In this chapter the scene is totally changed. It is no longer the accomplishment of promise, nor merely the retiring before the oppressive cruelty of him that was then in the place of outward authority. We have here the Lord morally dealing with, and judging, the religious chiefs of Jerusalem who, in their confidence and pride, undertook to blame His disciples and Himself with them. It was th...
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