Luke

Luke 2

Luke 2:1-7.19 We have had the forerunner of Jesus and the announcement of the birth of Jesus. But now this chapter opens with a providential event which we find nowhere else in the Gospels, and yet which explains a fact that is found in the first Gospel as well as in the third. Jesus was born in Bethlehem. His parents were in the habit of living in Galilee. How, then, if the ordinary residence of His parents was at Nazareth, which was at one extremity of the land, could he be born at Beth...

Luke 1

Luke 1:5ff.10 That the Gospel of Luke has a special aspect towards men at large, that it displays the grace of God towards the Gentiles who had been so long forgotten, or seemed to be so in the outward dealings of God, is very plain. Nevertheless some have found, as they thought, an insuperable difficulty to their admitting this to be the characteristic business of Luke, because we find, for instance, at the very beginning a striking occupation of the writer’s mind with the circumstance...

Introduction

L. Summary Of Contents.1 The third Gospel is distinguished by its display of God’s grace in man, which could be only and perfectly in the “Holy Thing” to be born and called the Son of God.1 Here, therefore, as the moral ways of God shine, so is manifested man’s heart in saint and sinner. Hence the preface and dedication to Theophilus, and the Evangelist’s motives for writing; hence also the beautiful picture of Jewish piety in presence of Divine intervention for both forerunner ...

Preface

Edited with annotations, by E. E. Whitfield. See “Appendix” towards the end of this series for more notes on the book of Mark. The numbers throughout this series that are not super-scripted refer to the notes on the Appendix page “All flesh shall see the salvation of God.” - Luke 3:6. The late William Kelly, for many years editor of the serial entitled The Bible Treasury, left in it a set of papers covering the whole of the Gospel according to Luke, for reproduction in colle...

Luke 9

Luke 9:1-6.128 Matt. 10:1-7, 9-11, 14; Mark 6:7-13. The last chapter showed Christ’s testimony to the change that was coming. This chapter gives us the twelve entrusted with the same testimony. They were to go forth representatives of Christ everywhere, invested with the power of the Kingdom. They had both “power and authority over all demons and to heal diseases,” as well as a mission “to proclaim 220 the kingdom of God.” The Lord gave them their authority. They were to be m...

Luke 10

Luke 10:1-12. (To V. 37)149 251 The mission of the Seventy 252 is peculiar to Luke. It has in itself a character of grace about it, though really on its rejection the harbinger of imminent judgment to Israel. All things are now made manifest since the transfiguration of the Lord. The former mission preceded that great event and is given elsewhere; but Luke adds the mission of the seventy. His death, His suffering, His rejection have all been fully announced, and accordingly His departure ...

Luke 11

Luke 11:1-4. Matt. 6:9-13. But blessed as receiving Jesus by faith may be, and sitting at His feet in the delight of love to hear from Him more and, more, prayer must not be forgotten. It has an incalculable value for us here below. It is in this world that we pray. Worship is the outgoing of the heart in heaven. Not that worship for us now is not true, for it is the greatest privilege into which the Christian is brought while on earth. A Christian thus anticipates the mind and employ...

Luke 21

Luke 21:1-4.312 Mark 12:41-44. Luke again is with Mark in giving the story of the widow poor but rich, and this doubtless for reasons analogous to their report of the exposure of the proud and empty scribes; Matthew has it not at all. For far different was the Israel of the then day, and with this he is occupied, the judgment coming on Jerusalem, rich but poor, with which the Lord concludes His denunciation of the scribes and Pharisees. And he looked up and saw the rich casting the...

Luke 20

Luke 20:1-8.296 Matt. 21:23-27; Mark 11:27-33. The Lord is now seen in contact with the various classes of officials and religious and political bodies among the Jews, who successively present themselves in the hope of perplexing and inveigling Him, but in effect to their own confusion. Essaying to judge Him, they expose themselves and are judged by the truth from His lips on their own evidence one after another. “And it came to pass on one of the297 days494 as he was teaching the...

Luke 19

Luke 19:1-10.283 The account of Zacchaeus is one of those peculiar to Luke; and we may readily see how strikingly it furthers the moral aim of the Spirit in this Gospel. Its collocation too may be at once explained on the same principle, supposing, as I do, that the facts occurred while the Lord was passing through Jericho, whereas the blind man Bartimaeus did not receive sight till He was on His way outside. But it seemed good to the Holy Ghost here, as often similarly elsewhere, to brin...
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