Luke

Matthew - John

The Gospel According To St. Matthew. The first thing that strikes the mind, as undesirable in an accurate version of the Scriptures, is, that words supplied by the translators, which have no counterpart in the original, should not be designated as such by italics as attempted more or less fully in the Authorised Bible. Dr. Scrivener’s Cambridge Paragraph Bible sought this more systematically, and therefore is happier in this respect. In the Revised New Testament, on the contrary, th...

Appendix

(E. E. Whitfield) Notes On The Introduction. § 1. 1 The third Gospel, exclusive of the Prologue or Preface, may be divided into four sections (cf. Moffatt): (i.) Luke 1:5 - 4:13, the preliminary period; (ii.) Luke 4:14 - 9:50, the Galilean Ministry; (iii.) Luke 9:51 - 18:30, the Ministry in Samaria and Perea; (iv.) Luke 18:31 — end, the closing Judean Ministry with the last supper, the Lord’s trial, crucifixion, resurrection and ascension. It also admits, including the Prol...

Luke 24

Luke 24:1-12.384 589 Matt. 28:1-8; Mark 16:1-8; John 20:1-13. The Sabbath day had interrupted the loving labours of the women with their spices. “On the first [day] of the week, very early [at deep dawn] in the morning” they385 returned.590 Love is usually quick-sighted; it might have the sense of coming danger where others were dull; it might have the presentiment of death where others saw triumph and the effect of burning zeal for God and His house. None but God could anticipate ...

Luke 23

Luke 23:1-25.355 Matt. 27:2, 11-31; Mark 15:1-20; John 18:28-19:16. We have next the scene before the Roman governor. Heartless as he was and with little conscience, still wilfulness characterized the Jews. “And the whole multitude of them rose up and led him to Pilate. And they began to accuse him, saying, We found this [man] perverting our356 nation and forbidding to give tribute to Caesar, saying that he himself is Christ, a king.” Thus they who were really impatient under the ...

Luke 22

Luke 22:1-2.324 Matt. 26:1-5; Mark 14:1f. The end approaches, with all its solemn and momentous issues, which our Evangelist relates after his wonted manner, adhering to moral connection rather than illustrating dispensational change, or the series of facts in His ministry, or the glory of His person. Luke 22:3-6. Matt. 26:14-16; Mark 14:10f. “Now the feast of unleavened [bread] which [is] called passover was drawing nigh,528 and the chief priests and the scribes were seek...

Luke 8

Luke 8:1-3.109 The last chapter broke out into the widest sphere, and brought in Divine power over human sickness and death — yea, more, Divine grace in presence of nothing but sin. Nevertheless moral ways are produced according to God’s own nature. Grace does not merely forgive. Those who are forgiven are born anew, and manifest their new life in suitable ways, and this in due season by the power of the Holy Ghost. In this chapter we find how grace goes forth in service. “It cam...

Luke 7

Luke 7:1-10.94 Matt. 8:5-13. We have already had the leper in Luke 5, which Matthew displaces, in order to put it along with the centurion’s servant, which opens our chapter; the one being used to show the dealings of the Lord Jesus and the character of His ministry among the Jews, and the other to bear witness to the great change which was about to take place in the going forth of mercy to the Gentiles on the rejection of Israel. Luke, as we have seen, was inspired by the Spirit of...

Luke 6

Luke 6:1-5.72 Matt. 12:1-8; Mark 2:23-28. The Evangelist is inspired to introduce these accounts of two Sabbaths here. Very probably also they took place at this point of time. If so, it is because the moral object of the Spirit in Luke coincided here with the historical order. This we may infer from a comparison with the order of Mark, who, as a rule, cleaves to the sequence of events. In Matthew, on the contrary, these facts are reserved for a much later point of his Gospel (Matt. 12...

Luke 4

Luke 4:1-13.44 Matt. 4:1-11; Mark 1:12, 13. In none of the Synoptic Gospels has the temptation a weightier place than here. Matthew confronts the Messiah with the great enemy of God’s people; and, giving the three closing acts just as they took place, reports them as they illustrate dispensation, and the great impending change, which is emphatically his theme. Mark notes the fact in its due time, and the devotedness of the blessed Servant of God thus tempted of the devil in the wilde...

Luke 3

Luke 3:1-14.38 Matt. 3:1-12; Mark 1:1-8. The dates are given in Luke reckoning from the years of the Roman empire. Judea is but a province of it, the Herods are in power. All this was a very humiliating and significant circumstance for Israel — impossible if the people had been faithful to God. But God does not hide the shame of His people; on the contrary He makes it manifest by this very fact — He gives it a record in His own eternal Word, the Word that liveth and abideth for eve...
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