Jude

Points of Interest in Jude

The believer’s position in Christ:

    - Sanctified by God

    - Set apart and dear to Him

    - Preserved in Jesus Christ

    - Called

Jude 1:3-6 gives the reason for the writing of this book. It says, “Earnestly contend for the faith.” Why should we do this? “Because some men have sneaked into the church unnoticed.” They are ungodly. They abuse the grace of God (See Rom 6) and they deny or disown our only Master & Lord Jesus Christ. As it was then, so it is now.

 

The Sin and Destiny of Godless Men

In Jude 1:5-7, we have some historical instances of apostasy:

    - Israel and their unbelief.

    - Fallen angels and their rebellion/disobedience (see Jude 1:6).

    - Sodom & Gomorrah and moral defilement/uncleanness (see Jude 1:7).

These examples give us a clear definition of apostasy.

Jude 1:8 gives a description of apostate teachers. These modern men are like the apostates of history. They pollute human nature, set authority at naught, and set at naught heavenly beings.

Jude 1:9-10 gives a warning against speaking evil of those in authority.

Jude 1:11 shows the way of Cain as self righteous and willful. It also mentions the error of Balaam, which was greed, and the rebellion of Korah, which was presumption. 

Jude 1:12 gives further description of these godless men. They are rainless clouds, fruitless trees, raging waves, and stars that follow no orbit.

Jude 1:13-15 shows that there will be an end to these men.

The Book of Jude (Walden)

John Walden

Gospel Folio Press
P.O. Box 2041 Grand Rapids, MI 49501

Foreword

I am both honored and humbled to have a part in preparing these messages by John Walden for publication. He was my uncle and I loved him dearly. He brought encouragement as well as admonition to me many times through the teaching of God’s Word. I always considered it a privilege to be in his presence and always came away refreshed by his love for the Lord and his presentation of God’s Word. The material presented in this book was taken from a taped series that John Walden presented to his radio audience over a period of thirteen weeks.

The Book of Jude is very relevant to our present day, and it is our desire that each of you who read it will be built up and encouraged in the Lord.

New Testament (Acts-Revelation)

Lesson 221: The Ascension Of Christ
Acts 1:1-11
Golden Text: Acts 1:11

I. The Great Commission. Matthew 28:18-20; Mark 16:15, 10.

1. The Person Who gave it. He had the right by virtue of His Person and His work.

2. The power for it—“Himself;” v. 18. Note the “power” as seen in (1) His birth; Luke 1:35. (2) Ministry; Luke 4:32. (3) Miracles; Luke 4:36. (4) Forgiveness; Matthew 9:6. (5) Death; John 10:18. (6) Resurrection. Romans 1:4; Colossians 2:13-15. (7) Ascension; Ephesians 1:20. (8) Coming; Matthew 24:30.

3. The plan of it. (1) The command “go ye.” (2) The scope, “world.” (3) The theme, “the Gospel.” (4) The persons, “every creature.”

4. The persons to whom given—His disciples. (1) Chosen. Mark 3:14; John 15:16. (2) Saved; Matthew 16:16. (3) Taught. (4) Commissioned. (5) Equipped.

5. The privilege of it. Ambassadors, co-workers, witnesses, trustees, servants of the Lord Jesus Christ.

6. The price of it. “Go” means leave. Cp. Luke 14:26.

7. The promise with it. “I am with you.” Cp Hebrews 13:5.

II. The Promise. Acts 1:4, 5.

1. Promised in O. T. Isaiah 32:15; Jeremiah 31:33; Ezek 11:19; Joel 228.

2. Promised in N. T. John 15:26—16:14.

III. The Questioning Disciples. Vs. 6-8.

1. The question; v. 6. (1) An earthly kingdom expected; Isaiah 2:2-4. (2) The King being rejected, the kingdom is in obeyance. Luke 19:14; Acts 3:14. (3) He will yet be King over the Earth; Psalm 2.

Jude

The epistle of Jude develops the history of the apostasy of Christendom, from the earliest elements that crept into the assembly to corrupt it, down to its judgment at the appearing of our Lord, but as moral apostasy by turning the grace of God into lasciviousness. In John they are gone out; here they have crept in, corrupting. It is a very short epistle, and containing instruction presented with much brevity, and with the energetic rapidity of the prophetic style, but of immense weight and ...

James - Jude

Epistle Of James. Why should the Revisers perpetuate the traditional blunder of “The General Epistle of James”? The best critics drop καθολική, following B K, A C being defective, but A also dropping it at the end: so many Latin copies, and the Pesch. Syr. It is not “general,” but specially addressed to the twelve tribes. James 1:1 has neither the closeness of a literal rendering, nor the freedom of the Authorised Version. If we are to adhere to the letter, it is in...

Lectures on the Epistle of Jude

Introduction.

We are arrived at those days now of which the Epistle of Jude speaks. I might say we are further, for the Epistles of John, although they are put before this Epistle, imply from their own contents that they were after. The order of the books in the N.T., we know is entirely human, and, in fact, is not the same in all Bibles. In English ones it is, but abroad it is not so, and in the more ancient copies of the Scriptures there was another order, in some respects even less correct than that which we have; because these Epistles of Jude and John are put before the Epistles of Paul. I need not say that there was no divine wisdom in that. I only mention it for the purpose of emphasising the absolute need of the guidance of the Holy Spirit. It is no matter what it is. The people in early days, it might have been thought, would have had a good sound judgment of how to arrange the books of Holy Scripture, but they had not. I am speaking now of a time long after the apostles, and we are still more distant. But we are at no disadvantage because of this, for the reason that the Holy Ghost Who was given, still abides. The ruin of the church does not affect that gift. It is a very solemn fact, and it does greatly bear upon the practical answer of the church to the glory of the Lord Jesus, and it makes not a small difference for the members of Christ. But the Lord provided for everything when He sent down the Holy Spirit; and He made known through the apostles that this was the sad history which awaited the church. It is the apostles who tell us what disasters were to flow in with a strong tide — nobody more so than the apostle Paul, who says, “I know that after my decease shall grievous wolves enter in among you, not sparing the flock.” Oh, what characters! What successors! Apostolic successors! — there are none. The successors were to be grievous wolves and perverse men.

Jude

We enter now on the last of those letters as they stand in the common Bible, THE EPISTLE OF JUDE. I will take this opportunity of instituting briefly a comparison with part of the second Epistle of Peter, which, you may remember, I passed over with a partial notice when discoursing on that subject. Doubts have been entertained, as most are aware, by men of some learning. From their similarity in various ways they have conceived that Peter must have borrowed from Judas or Judas from Peter; an...

Jude

The Epistle of Jude develops the history of the apostasy of Christendom, from the earliest elements that crept into the assembly to corrupt it, down to its judgment at the appearing of our Lord, but as moral apostasy by turning the grace of God into lasciviousness. In John they are gone out; here they have crept in, corrupting. It is a very short epistle, and containing instruction presented with much brevity, and with the energetic rapidity of the prophetic style, but of immense weight and exte...

Jude

The epistle of Jude bears a very strong resemblance to 2 Peter 2: 1-3: 14, which lies upon the surface and must be apparent to every reader. Both refer to very evil men, who come in amongst the saints, and both unmask their true character. Both quote Old Testament examples by way of illustration and warning; and amongst the examples both mention the angels that sinned, and Sodom and Gomorrah. Both remind us that even holy angels would not assume authority as these men do. Both quote t...

Lecture 7 - The Epistles and the Revelation

The Epistles We have before us, to-night, beloved brethren, the concluding portion of God's blessed Word; and I cannot but feel, as we enter upon it, how more than inadequate the account has been of the previous parts, while it is vain to promise one's self better either as to what remains. Still what account could be given that would not be inadequate? And if a partial representation be in some sort a misrepresentation, it will be sufficient to warn you not to suppose that wh...
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