Isaiah

Section 5: Isaiah 40 - 48

Isaiah 40 A sensibly different portion of the prophecy now opens on us, forming what may be called Isaiah’s second volume. No longer is the overthrow of kings and peoples in the foreground; nor are we occupied as before with the various Gentile enemies that long beset and troubled Israel. Hence, most appropriately introducing it, stands a touching controversy between God and His own people. We are evidently not looking here on God’s dealings without; we enter within. His judgement beg...

Section 6: Isaiah 49 - 57

Isaiah 49 A new division of Isaiah opens here. It is no longer Babylon and idolatry, and a destruction viewed as the overthrow of image worship in the earth. Here it is the far deeper question of Christ Himself and His rejection by the Jews. We find that this portion runs from Isa. 49:1 to the end of Isa. 57, where, as the former ending was “There is no peace, saith Jehovah, unto the wicked,” so the latter ends with “There is no peace saith my God, unto the wicked”. “Jehovah” ...

Section 7: Isaiah 58 To 66

Isaiah 58 To Isa. 58 and Isa. 59 one might add Isa. 60 as completing the series. This is the opening of the last section of the prophecy (chaps. 58 - 66). The Spirit had closed both His counts against God’s ancient people, their idolatry, and their rejection of the Messiah, with the consequences in the certainty of judgement, and not peace, for the wicked on either side. We have now a sequel or appendix, consisting of moral argument and appeal to the people, with a positive revelation o...

Isaiah

 Introduction Isaiah takes the first place; and in fact he is the most complete of all the prophets, and perhaps the most rich. The whole circle of God's thoughts with respect to Israel is more given here. Other prophets are occupied with certain portions only of the history of this people. We will give here the division of this book into subjects. There is in the beginning an appearance of confusion; nevertheless it helps to explain the moral bearing of the book. And here what...

Through and Through - Isaiah 43:2

Things will get better.  As a believer, I am sure of it.  No matter how bad things are, or how bad thing may become, I have God’s word on it that things are going to get better.  Jesus said “I go to prepare a place for you.”  I believe Him.  Jesus spoke of the “Father’s house.”   Yes, things are going to get better.  Even if in this world I become homeless, I know that I am just not home yet.  One day I will step up on the front porch of e...

Treasure - Isaiah 33:6

"The fear of the LORD is his treasure." (Isa. 33:6) Gold is no substitute for God. Isaiah writes of the righteous, "the fear of the LORD is his treasure." This fear is simply the other side of genuine faith. The early church understood what real riches were. The early church understood the economics of eternal things, and traded in the currency of consecrated stocks and bonds. Those stocks were often in prisons and the bonds in persecution, but they found God’s grace sufficient. The apo...

Foot - Isaiah 60:13

I will make the place of my feet glorious. (Isa. 60:13).   Jesus is the head, and this is Headship.    However,   we show that we understand headship by finding a place at his feet.   “I will make the place of my feet glorious.”   Too many times we want to push our way into the boardroom of God’s corporation wanting to find out what God plans to do.   We want to sit at the conference table more than at the communion table.   In the ...

Isaiah 36:1-40:8

After the lovely picture of blessedness on earth in the millennial age, presented to us in chapter 35, there is a break in the prophecy. The four chapters, 36-39, give us details of history in Hezekiah's reign, which are recounted also in 2 Kings, chapters 18-20, and again more briefly in 2 Chronicles 32. Remembering that we have no needless repetitions in Scripture, we may ask why these chapters should be inserted here? The answer, we think, is twofold. First, the personal piety o...

Isaiah 40:9-45:14

In spite of the fact that the revelation of the glory of the Lord brings to light, as nothing else does, the sinfulness and frailty of man, there is also brought "good tidings," and this it is which furnishes the "comfort" for "My people." Zion and Jerusalem are represented as lifting up the voice and saying to the cities of Judah "Behold your God!" About the sixth hour on the day of the crucifixion Pilate brought forth Jesus, and said to the crowd in Jerusalem, "Behold your King!" (...

Isaiah 24:1-27:13

The last of these cities, upon which a "burden" rested, being disposed of, the prophetic strain moves on to make known in a more general way what would be the state of things at the end of the age. It is a dark and sorrowful picture: the whole earth turned upside down and the inhabitants scattered, no matter to what class they belonged. And not only Israel is in view, for though the closing accusations of verse 5 may have special reference to them, since laws and ordinances were special...
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