Hebrews

Division III. Chaps. 4:14-10:39

The Priesthood of the Heavenly Sanctuary Superior to that of Aaron, Resting on the Better Sacrifice of Christ Jesus Subdivision 1. Chaps. 4:14-7:28 The Enthroned Priest, after the Order of Melchisedec, though of the Pattern of Aaron We are now to consider the Priesthood of Christ, a precious and wondrous theme meaning much for all believers during His present session at God’s right hand in Heaven, but something into which Jewish believers could enter with peculiar interest because ...

Division V. Chaps. 12, 13 Life in Accordance with the Truth of the New Dispensation

Section A. Chap. 12:1-17 Warning and Encouragement to Go On As we enter upon the last division of the Epistle, we note that as in almost all of the apostolic letters it has to do with the practical outcome which should result from the apprehension of the truth set forth in the chapters that have gone before. For these Hebrews of old who had confessed the name of the Lord, it had indeed a special application calling them outside the camp of Judaism, with which they had been identified al...

Division IV. Chap. 11 The Path of Faith and the Heroes of Faith in all Dispensations

Section A. Chap. 11:1-3 The Nature of Faith Some one has called this eleventh chapter “God’s honor roll.” It is indeed a wonderful record of the triumphs of faith on the part of eminent servants of God in four different dispensations. Abel, Enoch and Noah, in antediluvian days; Noah and Abraham himself in the dispensation of government; then Abraham, after the promise of the Seed, to Joseph the patriarch; and Moses and the other worthies of the dispensation of law. All these were ...

Chapter 5

The subject of the priesthood of Christ, and His formal appointment to it by God, is here continued, with exhortations and admonitions to believers connected therewith. Verses 1, 2.—Here we learn that the very idea of a priest is one who can “bear gently with the ignorant and the erring.” An angel would not have been fitted to fill the office: he could not have sympathized at all as he never suffered. Hence until the real High Priest became manifest, men were appointed to the priest...

Chapter 4

Here still the subject of God’s rest, and our rest with Him is continued. In the early part of Chapter 3, we see God in His rest—His redemption rest in Christ; hence the reference is to the tabernacle of old. But in the latter part of chapter 3, the subject is the believer entering into God’s rest, and the allusion is changed to the wilderness, and the passage of some through it into Canaan. Verse 1.—The rest here is “His rest.” A “promise” shews that we have not come to i...

Chapter 3

The first two chapters have been intensely doctrinal. In chapter 1, the enthroned Sin-purger is seen at rest, and His rest in yonder glory is eternal. In chapter 2, His people are seen in association with Him for ever there, and now we come to listen to divine instruction concerning the eternal rest of God, in which His people are to share. Verse 1.—“Wherefore holy brethren, partakers of the heavenly calling.” In addressing us as “holy brethren,” the allusion is to chapter 2:11,...

Chapter 2

The first four verses of this chapter ought to be joined to chapter 1: they specially warn against the neglect of this great salvation, which God has brought so near. So great that the three Persons in the Godhead had all to do with the providing of it (see chap. 9:14, with which compare Luke 15), and here are all seen witnessing to its greatness. God speaks “in Son”— “therefore we ought to give the more earnest heed to the things that were heard,” lest, like a ship in motion, when...

Chapter 1

This Epistle is dated from that unsullied glory into which Christ has entered. First, He is seen alone, amid the uncreated light of God’s throne. There He is speaking to us. Verse 1—God hath spoken. What a mercy! He has spoken twice. First, unto the fathers in the prophets, “at sundry times and in divers manners,”—a bit to one and a bit to another, piecemeal: to Adam, to Abraham, to David and others. It has pleased Him to put all these bits together, and to reveal them to us. We...

Introduction

Of Beresford, London. (Supplied By Mr. R. Lundin Brown.) Kilmarnock, Scotland: John Ritchie, Publisher Of Christian Literature. And through all Booksellers. Introduction Each of the inspired Epistles has a specific subject of its own. Hebrews unveils the glories of Christ’s person and tells out the value of His work. This is God’s preservative for His saints against Judaism and worldly religion. The subject of each of the Gospels is found at the close; of the Epistles, a...

Chapter 6

The inspired writer now turns to describe some, who, while they had some head knowledge of the doctrines of Christianity, had no life. They were contented with the outward form, and evidently had, like many professors of our own day, a certain pleasure in holding and descanting on the externals of a religion, which they had never received the living power of in their souls. Solemn beyond degree is the description here given by the Holy Ghost of such professors and their end. How far it is po...
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