Habakkuk

Old Testament (Jeremiah-Malachi)

Lesson 118: Jeremiah’s Call And Ministry
Jeremiah 1:1—2:19
Golden Texts Proverbs 29:25

I. The Historic Setting; 1:1-3. The decline of the nation of Judah due to its disobedience to the word of God and its sinful practices. Cp. 2 Chronicles 36:14-16. Jeremiah has been well called “The prophet of the bleeding heart and the iron will.”

II. The Divine Call; vs. 4, 5. Note its prenatal character. Cp. Galatians 1:15; Romans 8:29-31; Ephesians
1:4; John 17:2, 6, 9, 10, 11. 12, 24; 1 Peter 1:2; Romans 11:33, 34. Here is the glorious truth of God’s foreknowledge and predestination. Isaiah 40:28; 46:10; Acts 15:18.

III. The Response; V. 6. A sense of his weakness, ignorance and inexperience. Cp. Other calls and other responses. Moses, Exodus 4:10; Isaiah, Isaiah 6:5; Solomon, 1 Kings 3:7.

IV. The Divine Encouragement; vs. 7-19.

1. Divine Promise; v. 7. Think of Who is speaking! God’s promises are His enablings. Ephesians 3:20.

2. Divine protection; v. 8. “I am with Thee.” Cp. Hebrews 13:5; Matthew 28:19, 20; Isaiah 41:10; Deuteronomy 31:6; 2 Timothy 4:16, 17; Psalm 23:4.

3. Divine enduement. V. 9. Here is verbal inspiration Cp. 2 Timothy 3:16; 2 Peter 1:21. Cp. 2 Samuel 23:2. “Thus saith the Lord.” Emphasize this.

4. Divine plan; v. 10. Note the order. First to pull down ere setting up. Man needs to be brought down. Matthew 9:12, 13? Luke 19:10. There must be repentance, humiliation, self judgment and confession of sin before there can be a building up in the holy faith. The great need of many is to unlearn their false theories before they can take in God’s truth.

5. The Divine illustration; vs. 11-16. All through this book symbols and pictures are used to convey the lesson.

Habakkuk

How diverse and perfect is the development of the ways of God in His word! Not only does it contain the great events that establish the fact of His government, and the character of that government—not only the proofs of His fidelity to His people, and His estimate of the evil that led to judgment, but also His answer to every feeling caused by the series of events by which He chastised them, the relief which He affords to the anguish that must be felt by one who is faithful, on account of ...

The Vision: and the just shall live by faith

Habakkuk 2:2-4

“Jehovah answered me, and said, Write the vision and make [it] plain upon tables, that he may run that readeth it. For the vision [is] yet for an appointed time, but at the end it shall speak, and not lie: though it tarry, wait for it; because it will surely come, it will not tarry” (Hab. 2:2, 3). It is well known that the apostle Paul applies this to the very centre of the vision, and of all visions, to Jesus Christ the Lord coming back to glory. In Hebrews 10 we are told that “He that shall come will come, and will not tarry.” Such is the way in which the Spirit displays His admirable use of Old Testament scripture. Already had the Lord Jesus personally come the first time, and been rejected by the Jews to their own ruin. The apostle’s use of it gives the words a much more personal force; yet, we can see, not departing from, but only adding to, the evident issue contemplated in Hebrews 2, 3, which can have no greater fulfilment short of that crowning event.

But then there is another remark to be made here. The prophet lets us know that the vision of God is written so that a man does not require, I know not what accessories, in order to understand it. It was to be made plain on tablets, distinctly set out in large impressive characters. But it is not said, as the common view assumes, that the runner may read, but rather that the reader may run, and thus, it would seem, spread the joyful intelligence one to another. It has been suggested that we should compare Daniel 12:4; but this, I think, carries out the idea of running to and fro, and increasing knowledge thus among such as have an ear to hear. The passage then holds out no premium to the careless reader, but shows how the reader of the vision will be stimulated thereby to earnest spread of the truth he receives.

Habakkuk

There is no prophetic delivery among the twelve lesser books more peculiar and characteristic than that of Habakkuk. It has no longer the occupation with the enemy as its main feature, although the enemy is referred to; but for its prominent topic we find the soul of the prophet himself, as representing the faithful among the Jews, brought into deep exercises, and indeed a kind of colloquy between God Himself and the prophet, so as to set out not only that which gave him trouble of heart, bu...

Habbakuk

 Introduction How diverse and perfect is the development of the ways of God in His word! Not only does it contain the great events that establish the fact of His government, and the character of that government-not only the proofs of His fidelity to His people, and His estimate of the evil that led to judgment, but also His answer to every feeling caused by the series of events by which He chastised them, the relief which He affords to the anguish that must be felt by one who is fait...

Lecture 5 - The Books of the Prophets

We are now to take up the books of the prophets, the third division of the Old Testament, and that in which we are most of all brought face to face with God Himself. The vail is of course not yet removed; yet as more and more the condition of the people was discovered hopeless, and even as judgment more and more, stroke upon stroke, fell upon them, to faith God began to speak with increasing plainness. That the just shall live by faith was witnessed by a prophet, and how full...

Habakkuk - The Thinker

Nineveh had fallen and once again, God’s people had quickly forgotten God. How dense and dull is the natural man. Habakkuk had something on his mind. It is called a "burden." He was troubled when He compared what he knew about God with what was going on around him. Why was God allowing evil to run rampant? Why was not God doing something about sin? Why were sinners getting aw...

Habakkuk

Habakkuk J. G. Bellett. Section 8 of: The Minor Prophets (Ed. W. Kelly, Allan, 1870.) We must begin with God, as sinners, on the principle of faith, and go on with Him to the end, as saints, on the same principle. "The just shall live by faith." (See Rom. 1: 17; Gal. 3: 11; Heb. 10: 38; taken from Hab. 2: 4.) This prophecy of Habakkuk has great moral value for us. But besides this, it is seasonable now; for in this our day things are ripening to a crisis, as they were in the day of Habakk...

The Origin of Sin

The origin of sin has perplexed Christians throughout history. Many have asked: Since God is supremely good, untainted by sin, and infinitely sovereign over His universe, how is it that sin entered the world which God declared to be “very good”? It has been suggested that God could have created angels and man in a state of holy perfection, so it would have been impossible for them to sin. However, this would have resulted in reducing God’s noblest creation to mere machine-like ...
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