Galatians

His Son - Galatians 4:4

"In the fullness of time, God sent forth his Son, made of a woman, made under the law, to redeem them that are under the law, that we might receive the adoption of sons." Gal. 4:4   "God sent forth his Son."   That's God With Us "made of a woman"          That's God Of Us "made under the law"        That's God For Us "that we might receive"      That's God In Us   ...

Galatians 6

A contrast seems to be implied between verse 21 of chapter 5 and the first verse of chapter 6. The former contemplates those who are characterized by doing certain evil things. The latter speaks of a man being overtaken in an offence. Those who are characterized by evil will never enter the kingdom of God, whereas the man overtaken in evil is to be restored. It is taken for granted that he is a true believer. The appeal to restore such an one is addressed to "ye which are spiritual....

Galatians 5

In the first verse of chapter 5 we have the main point of the epistle compressed into a few words. Christ has set us free in a wonderful liberty, and in that we are to stand fast, refusing to be again entangled in bondage. Let us refresh our memories as to the extent and character of the liberty into which we have been brought. In the first place we have been set free from the law as the ground of our justification before God. This was previously stated in Gal. 2: 16. We are "j...

Galatians 4

The opening verses of chapter 4 gather up the thoughts that have occupied the latter part of chapter 3, and summarize them in very crisp fashion. The custom that prevailed in the houses of the nobility-and that still in measure prevail is such circles-are used as an illustration. The heir to the estate, so long as he is in infancy, is placed under restraint, just as the servants are. Tutors and governors hold him in what appears to him to be bondage. He just has to do as he is told, and...

Galatians 3

The apostle calls them "foolish" or senseless, for they had not themselves had the spiritual sense to see whither these false teachers had been leading them. They had been like men bewitched, and under a spell of evil, and they had been led to the brink of the awful conclusion that Christ had died for nothing-that His death had been in fact a huge mistake! On the edge of this precipice they were standing, and the Apostle's pungent reasoning had come as a flash of light amidst their dark...

Galatians 2

Our chapter falls quite simply into two parts. First, verses 1 to 10, in which the Apostle recounts what happened on the occasion of his second visit to Jerusalem after his conversion. Second, verses 11 to 21, in which he tells of an incident that happened at Antioch not long after his second visit to Jerusalem, and which had a very definite bearing upon the point at issue with the Galatians. The first visit was about three years after his conversion (Gal. 1: 18), so the second, be...

Galatians 1

In opening his letter Paul not only announced his apostleship but emphasized the fact that he held this place directly from God. It had reached him from no man, not even the twelve who were chosen before him. Men were not the source of it, nor had he received it by means of them as channels. God was the source of it, and it had reached him by Jesus Christ. Hence he had a fulness of authority not possessed by the Judaising teachers who were troubling them, for they at best could only ...

Introduction to Galatians

In his epistle to the Galatians the Apostle Paul is not so much concerned with expounding his Gospel as with defending it. The mischief-makers were evidently certain Jews who professed conversion to Christianity, and yet were more zealous of the law than they were of Christ; men of the same stamp as those we have mentioned in Acts 15: 1 and 5. We find allusions to their mischievous activities in some of the other epistles. They had gained a certain measure of success amongst the C...

Lecture 7 - The Epistles and the Revelation

The Epistles We have before us, to-night, beloved brethren, the concluding portion of God's blessed Word; and I cannot but feel, as we enter upon it, how more than inadequate the account has been of the previous parts, while it is vain to promise one's self better either as to what remains. Still what account could be given that would not be inadequate? And if a partial representation be in some sort a misrepresentation, it will be sufficient to warn you not to suppose that wh...

The Two Natures and What They Imply

(John iii. 6; Galatians v. 17.) When we speak of there being two natures in the believer, as these passages, with others, plainly teach, it is needful, in the first place, to explain the words that we are using. The more so, as the word "nature" is not of frequent use in Scripture, and such expressions as "the old nature" and "the new nature "- in frequent use among ourselves - do not occur. I am not on this account condemning the expressions. They may be useful enough, an...
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