Galatians

Galatians

The Readers

Galatia was a Roman province in Asia Minor. It was populated chiefly by Gauls who emigrated from France in 300 B.C. They were a very impulsive, changeable people.

This probably accounts for their enthusiastic reception of Paul when he first came to them (see Galatians 4:14). “But ye received me as an angel of God, even as Jesus Christ,” and accounts no doubt for their sudden swing to “another gospel” (see Galatians 1:6).

Preface to Romans

H. A. Ironside

Originally published in 1920.

Unless otherwise noted, Scripture quotations are from the King James Version of the Holy Bible. Scripture quotations marked RV are from the Revised Version of the Holy Bible (Church of England, 1885).

Lectures On The Epistle To The Romans
Preface

The present volume consists of notes of lectures on the Roman Letter, substantially as given to the students of the Moody Bible Institute of Chicago, Illinois; the Evangelical Theological College of Dallas, Texas; and at various Bible conferences throughout the United States and Canada in recent years.

They are sent forth in printed form in response to the earnest solicitation of many who heard them, and in the hope that they will be used of God to the blessing of numbers who cannot be reached by the spoken word.

The author is indebted far more than he realizes to writers and speakers who have gone over the same ground before him. No claim is made for originality. It is God’s truth—not that of any teacher—and as such it is committed to His care for His glory.

H. A. Ironside

New Testament (Acts-Revelation)

Lesson 221: The Ascension Of Christ
Acts 1:1-11
Golden Text: Acts 1:11

I. The Great Commission. Matthew 28:18-20; Mark 16:15, 10.

1. The Person Who gave it. He had the right by virtue of His Person and His work.

2. The power for it—“Himself;” v. 18. Note the “power” as seen in (1) His birth; Luke 1:35. (2) Ministry; Luke 4:32. (3) Miracles; Luke 4:36. (4) Forgiveness; Matthew 9:6. (5) Death; John 10:18. (6) Resurrection. Romans 1:4; Colossians 2:13-15. (7) Ascension; Ephesians 1:20. (8) Coming; Matthew 24:30.

3. The plan of it. (1) The command “go ye.” (2) The scope, “world.” (3) The theme, “the Gospel.” (4) The persons, “every creature.”

4. The persons to whom given—His disciples. (1) Chosen. Mark 3:14; John 15:16. (2) Saved; Matthew 16:16. (3) Taught. (4) Commissioned. (5) Equipped.

5. The privilege of it. Ambassadors, co-workers, witnesses, trustees, servants of the Lord Jesus Christ.

6. The price of it. “Go” means leave. Cp. Luke 14:26.

7. The promise with it. “I am with you.” Cp Hebrews 13:5.

II. The Promise. Acts 1:4, 5.

1. Promised in O. T. Isaiah 32:15; Jeremiah 31:33; Ezek 11:19; Joel 228.

2. Promised in N. T. John 15:26—16:14.

III. The Questioning Disciples. Vs. 6-8.

1. The question; v. 6. (1) An earthly kingdom expected; Isaiah 2:2-4. (2) The King being rejected, the kingdom is in obeyance. Luke 19:14; Acts 3:14. (3) He will yet be King over the Earth; Psalm 2.

Galatians

the epistle to the Galatians sets before us the great source of the afflictions and conflicts of the apostle in the regions where he had preached the glad tidings; that which was at the same time the principal means employed by the enemy to corrupt the gospel. God, it is true, in His love, has suited the gospel to the wants of man. The enemy brings down that which still bears its name to the level of the haughty will of man and the corruption of the natural heart, turning Christianity into a...

Galatians - Colosians

The Epistle To The Galatians. The changes in this brief Epistle need not occupy us long. In Gal. 1:6 the present force is properly given, “ye are so quickly removing” (not “removed”), and “in” (not “into”) the grace of Christ, and of course, “unto a different [not “another”] gospel:” a very considerable correction of mere renderings, and long known to be necessary, for a single verse. So also the slight shade of distinction between “should preach” in verse 8 an...

The Blessedness and Scope of the New Creation

2 Cor. 5:14-19; Gal. 6:12-16; Eph. 1:19 - 2:10

When looking at the crossing of Jordan by the children of Israel, we observed that the case of believers now is not like that of God’s people of old who, when they crossed the Jordan, left the wilderness and had done with it for ever. With us it is not so; we are, in a certain sense, both in the wilderness and in Canaan at the same time. Egypt we have done with totally and for ever, because in fact the wilderness is just what Egypt becomes to the child of God. That is to say, the world, where once we had all our pleasures, and all our resources, becomes to us now a place which can only be described as a moral desert, where we find nothing to strengthen, to refresh, or to cheer.

In connection with the same subject we noticed the remarkable fact, that of the great army of six hundred thousand men who came out of Egypt only two crossed the Jordan and entered the land — Caleb (the man of faith), and Joshua (type of the energy of the Spirit of Christ in a man). This, I have no doubt, is intended to teach us that we can only take possession of our heavenly inheritance on the principle of faith and in the power of the Holy Ghost.

Jordan, no doubt, presents to us the death of Christ, but not His death for us; it is rather our death with Him, where all that we are in nature disappears. This does not mean, as some have fancied, that we are, or should be, dead to nature. A person claiming to be dead to nature is not a Christian. But while this foolish thought is totally absent from, and contrary to, the scriptures, the serious truth which we do find there is that we are dead in nature. This is what is very definitely presented to us in the portion of the epistle to the Ephesians which we read together.

Lectures on Galatians

Galatians 1

I trust to be enabled to show, in looking at the Epistle to the Galatians, that this portion of the word of God is formed with the same skill (as, indeed, a revelation of God must be) which we have found occasion to remark in other books of the Old and New Testaments; that it is stamped with the same evidence of divine design; and that, having a special object, the Holy Ghost subordinates all the details to the great thought and task that He has in hand.

Now, it is plain, from a very cursory glance, that the object of the epistle was not so much the assertion of the truth of justification by faith in contrast with works of law, as the vindicating it against the efforts of the enemy who would merge it under ordinances and human authority; in other words, it is the antidote to the Judaizing poison of many who professed the name of the Lord.

In Romans, it is more the bringing out of positive truth; in Galatians, the recovery of the truth after it had been taught and received, the enemy seeking to swamp it by bringing in the law as the conjoint means of justification. The Holy Ghost sets Himself, by the Apostle Paul, thoroughly to nullify all this force of Satan; and this gives a peculiar tone to the epistle.

Galatians

Galatians 1. We saw the second of Corinthians characterized by the most rapid transitions of feeling, by a deep and fervent sense of God’s consolations, by a revulsion so much the more powerful in a heart that entered into things as few hearts have ever done since the world began. For as the first epistle had put down man in every form, and more particularly man as an expression of the world in its pride, so the second epistle breathes the comfort of God’s restoring grace, and is charact...

Galatians

Introduction The epistle to the Galatians sets before us the great source of the afflictions and conflicts of the apostle in the regions where he had preached the glad tidings; that which was at the same time the principal means employed by the enemy to corrupt the gospel. God, it is true, in His love, has suited the gospel to the wants of man. The enemy brings down that which still bears its name to the level of the haughty will of man and the corruption of the natural heart, turning Chris...

Flesh Wounds - Galatians 5:16

“This I say then, Walk in the Spirit, and ye shall not fulfill the lust of the flesh.”   Gal. 5:16  Remember the old cowboy movies?   Remember the hero being hit during a gunfight, holding his arm and telling us not to worry because it was “only a flesh wound?”   How silly! Ouch,   as if flesh wounds were   nothing to worry about.   Flesh wounds can be the most painful for that is where most of our nerve endings are; that’s where our fe...
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