Ezekiel

Israel's Place in History

The Vision of the Valley of Dry Bones (Ezekiel 37:1-10)

[Describe this] This prophecy was given over 2,500 years ago, and it is being fulfilled in our generation. This prophecy declares that in “the end times” the whole nation (the twelve tribes) will be gathered from the nations of the world.

The Scattering of the Nation  

Leviticus 26:33 - “And I will scatter you among the nations, and will draw out a sword after you; and your land shall be desolate, and your cities waste.”

Leviticus 26:38 - “And ye shall perish among the nations, and the land of your enemies shall eat you up.”  

Preface & Introduction

Loizeaux Brothers, Inc., Bible Truth Depot
Neptune, New Jersey
First Edition, June 1949
Twelfth Printing, November 1980

Preface

For many years it has been on my heart to try to produce a running commentary on the book of Ezekiel, but until the present, circumstances have not permitted this. During the last few months it has brought great blessing to my own soul as I have given many hours daily to meditation upon and study of this remarkable book, of which the present work is the result.

No one can be more conscious than I of its many imperfections, and yet it is my hope that there may be enough in it of a truly spiritual character that it will prove a means of blessing and edification to those who take the time to read it thoughtfully and prayerfully.

H. A. Ironside

Introduction

Of all the prophetic books Ezekiel is the one that has been neglected most. Many persons are repelled by the marvelous vision of the opening chapter and, finding it too difficult to understand, proceed no further; and so they lose the blessing they would gain otherwise by a careful study of this entire book in dependence upon the Holy Spirit as teacher, who inspired the prophet to write it (2 Peter 1:21). Yet to the reverent student the book presents no real difficulties that may not be overcome by a careful comparison of scripture with scripture. Thus one may be preserved from a private interpretation which would not harmonize with the rest of God’s revealed Word.

Old Testament (Jeremiah-Malachi)

Lesson 118: Jeremiah’s Call And Ministry
Jeremiah 1:1—2:19
Golden Texts Proverbs 29:25

I. The Historic Setting; 1:1-3. The decline of the nation of Judah due to its disobedience to the word of God and its sinful practices. Cp. 2 Chronicles 36:14-16. Jeremiah has been well called “The prophet of the bleeding heart and the iron will.”

II. The Divine Call; vs. 4, 5. Note its prenatal character. Cp. Galatians 1:15; Romans 8:29-31; Ephesians
1:4; John 17:2, 6, 9, 10, 11. 12, 24; 1 Peter 1:2; Romans 11:33, 34. Here is the glorious truth of God’s foreknowledge and predestination. Isaiah 40:28; 46:10; Acts 15:18.

III. The Response; V. 6. A sense of his weakness, ignorance and inexperience. Cp. Other calls and other responses. Moses, Exodus 4:10; Isaiah, Isaiah 6:5; Solomon, 1 Kings 3:7.

IV. The Divine Encouragement; vs. 7-19.

1. Divine Promise; v. 7. Think of Who is speaking! God’s promises are His enablings. Ephesians 3:20.

2. Divine protection; v. 8. “I am with Thee.” Cp. Hebrews 13:5; Matthew 28:19, 20; Isaiah 41:10; Deuteronomy 31:6; 2 Timothy 4:16, 17; Psalm 23:4.

3. Divine enduement. V. 9. Here is verbal inspiration Cp. 2 Timothy 3:16; 2 Peter 1:21. Cp. 2 Samuel 23:2. “Thus saith the Lord.” Emphasize this.

4. Divine plan; v. 10. Note the order. First to pull down ere setting up. Man needs to be brought down. Matthew 9:12, 13? Luke 19:10. There must be repentance, humiliation, self judgment and confession of sin before there can be a building up in the holy faith. The great need of many is to unlearn their false theories before they can take in God’s truth.

5. The Divine illustration; vs. 11-16. All through this book symbols and pictures are used to convey the lesson.

Ezekiel

In the prophecy of Ezekiel we have left the touching ground we were on in Jeremiah. He was within with the judgment hanging over the guilty city, and under the oppressive sense of the evil which brought on the ruin, bearing a testimony which, as to apparent result, was of no avail, though it maintained, in personal sorrow of heart according to human measure, the glory of God. Ezekiel had been carried into captivity with the king Jehoiachin; at least, he was one of those made captive at th...

Ezekiel

Preface.

The work, now presented to the reader, cannot be said to be uncalled for; as the Book of Ezekiel is one of those least entered into and expounded as a whole in the Bible. There is little to reward the student in the Greek comments of Origen, Ephraem Syr., Greg. Naz., or Theodoret, less, if possible, in the Latin of Jerome or Gregory the Great. One need not speak of Mediaevals or Reformers, of Jesuits or Puritans, of modern Germans or their English admirers. All lacked the key. Which of them saw the heavenly glory of Christ and the church, as a distinct thing from the kingdom? Which of them did not deny the hopes of Israel? Hence, save pious moral reflections, there is nothing to speak of in these writings, some of them voluminous, like the architectural work of H. Pradus and J. B. Villalpandus, in three enormous folio volumes without a ray of heavenly light.

I am far from pretending, in this brief exposition, to do more than help the Christian to a general but true notion of the contents, aim, and character of the prophecy, as far as I at present understand it, though sensible of the defects of my little book more than most are likely to be.

Blackheath, London, January, 1876.

Introduction.

Of the prophet on whose book we enter we know few circumstances, none save the scanty personal particulars which he gives in the course of his prophecies, bound up with them and expressive of their character. We are told that he was a priest, son of Buzi; also of his wife and her sudden death, a sign to Israel; and of his residence at Tel-abib by the Chebar in the land of the Chaldeans. He speaks of Daniel his contemporary, in his own day famous for righteousness even as Noah and Job.1

Ezekiel

 Introduction In the prophecy of Ezekiel we have left the touching ground we were on in Jeremiah. He was within with the judgment hanging over the guilty city, and under the oppressive sense of the evil which brought on the ruin, bearing a testimony which, as to apparent result, was of no avail, though it maintained, in personal sorrow of heart according to human measure, the glory of God. Ezekiel had been carried into captivity with the king Jehoiachin; at least, he was one of th...

Lecture 5 - The Books of the Prophets

We are now to take up the books of the prophets, the third division of the Old Testament, and that in which we are most of all brought face to face with God Himself. The vail is of course not yet removed; yet as more and more the condition of the people was discovered hopeless, and even as judgment more and more, stroke upon stroke, fell upon them, to faith God began to speak with increasing plainness. That the just shall live by faith was witnessed by a prophet, and how full...

Ezekiel's 40 Days

Israel's End; Or Guilt, Grace, And Glory. (Ezek. 4: 1-11) "NOW it came to pass in the thirtieth year, in the fourth month, in the fifth day of the month, as I was among the captives by the river of Chebar, that the heavens were opened, and I saw visions of God. In the fifth day of the month, which was the fifth year of king Jehoiachin's captivity, the word of the Lord came expressly unto Ezekiel the priest, the son of Buzi, in the land of the Chaldeans by the river Chebar; and the hand ...

Sacrificing Children to Idols

The following article was written around 1985. “For when they had slain their children to their idols, then they came the same day into the sanctuary to profane it… (Ezekiel 23:39) In this portion of Ezekiel God is pronouncing judgment upon Israel and Judah for their idolatry. They were so far removed from God they even sacrificed their children to idols. Most likely this in is reference to the fire god Molech. It is reported that the image was heated to a glowing red, and t...

The Glory of God

God created man for His own glory, and fitted him for communion with Himself. This is intimated by His visiting our first parents in the cool of the day. He doubtless taught them to hallow the beginning and end of each day with worship.

When man fell, his heart became alienated from God, and the link formed between God and His creatures was sundered. Consequently, though after man had sinned, God walked as usual in the garden in the cool of the day, He missed the one who should have been looking out for His presence. Therefore He called unto Adam, and said to him, "Where art thou?"

 

Instead of casting man off, God, in His condescending kindness, proceeded to renew the communion that had been broken, and to establish it on a firmer basis. A very clear intimation of this gracious purpose is given in His word through Moses to Israel: "Let them make Me a sanctuary; that I may dwell among them" (Ex. 25:8). And after the tabernacle was made according to the given pattern, and the sacrifices had been offered and accepted, "the cloud covered the tent of the congregation, and the glory of Jehovah filled the tabernacle." God fulfilled His promise: "There will I meet with the children of Israel."

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