Esther

Esther 8, 9 & 10

In the book of Esther, we find many characters and a valuable story with lessons of application to our own spiritual lives. Let us look specifically at Esther 8-10 and what these events teach us.

 

First, in Esther 8:1-4, we see that Mordecai is exalted after his run-in with Haman, who has been hanged as a punishment by the king. Esther has been given all of Haman’s possessions, and has reported her relation to Mordecai to King Xerxes; thus, Mordecai is brought into his presence. The king gives Mordecai Haman’s ring he has taken from him, and Esther sets Mordecai over the house of Haman (meaning he gives him control of his estate and possessions). This event describes Mordecai’s sudden rise in power and identifies Esther as a suppliant. We also see the beautiful display of grace extended by the king in this circumstance, despite the fact that he is not a Jew like Esther and Mordecai.

The Book of Esther

General Information

The name of God is not found in the book, neither is there any indirect reference made to Him. But nowhere in the Scripture is God’s care for His people more evident

The books of Ezra, Nehemiah, and Esther were written about the same time and record events around the same period of history.

The Jews had been taken captive by Nebuchadnezzar. Then his kingdom was conquered by the Medes and the Persians. They were good to the Jews.

In Ezra 1 we find that Cyrus issued a proclamation calling together those who had the desire to return to Jerusalem to build the house of the Lord. There were those who responded, a feeble remnant, but the majority chose to remain in Babylon. The books of Ezra and Nehemiah tell of the experiences of this faithful remnant as they struggled against great difficulties to build the Temple, the wall and the city.

The book of Esther tells of the experience of those who chose to stay in Babylon. As a point of interest those who stayed in Babylon became so involved in the affairs of the world that they were swallowed up in the nations and lost their identity. They are known today as the “lost ten tribes of Israel.” That is, lost so far as man is concerned, but not lost to God.

Let me make on comment here about the problems which the Jews encountered at this time. They were brought upon tem because they had chosen a path which was in their own self-interest rather than God’s. So that much of the trouble they encountered was of their own making.

Chapter 1

Read verses 1-4 and note the extent of the Persian kingdom. This is the “silver kingdom which succeeded the “load of gold.” See Daniel 2. This first put on by Ahasureus was a lavish affair, but was very orderly.

Prefatory Note for Esther

The book of Esther contains principles of great value at all times, but especially at the present one, when some who delve very little into the word of God are liable to wonder at some of His ways, and grow discouraged in the path of obedience.

It is needful therefore, that such, and all of us, should have detailed before us the fact that “obedience is better than sacrifice, and to harken than the fat of rams.” May God richly bless your effort to bring to the surface what His Spirit has laid up for us in this little book.

Yours affectionately in Christ,

Paul J. Loizeaux.

Introduction

No attentive reader can fail to note the great distinguishing characteristic of the book of Esther: the name of God is not found in it. No divine title whatever, nor any pronoun referring to God is there in its ten stirring chapters. Neither is there any reference to prayer which involves the thought of God as the hearer and answerer. At first glance it might seem that the book of Esther is not unique in this, as the Song of Solomon apparently keeps company with it in the omission of any title of the Deity. But it is not really so; for the name “Jah” (the Eternal) is, in the original, found in the last clause of chap. 8:6. “Jealously is cruel as the grave: the coals thereof are coals of fire which hath a most vehement flame;” (literally as noted in the margin, “a flame of Jah”). And even if this were not, still the bridegroom is so evidently Jehovah, whose bride Israel was and shall yet be manifested to be, that almost every masculine pronoun may be said to refer to Him. The Song of Songs therefore is really a perfect contrast with the book of Esther, being from end to end full of Jehovah as the Bridegroom of Israel.

Esther

The Book of Nehemiah has shewn us Judah reinstated in the land, but deprived of the presence of God, except as to general blessing, and unacknowledged by God as His people; so that, whatever length of time may elapse, their condition leads us morally up to the moment when the Messiah should be presented to seal up prophecy, to finish the transgression, and to bring in everlasting righteousness. That book gave us the last word—until the coming of Christ—of the history of Israel; and that,...

Esther

The Captivity under Providence among the Gentiles.

In the book of Nehemiah we have the last look which scripture furnishes historically at the remnant in Jerusalem, justly subjected to the world-power for their apostacy from Jehovah, yet provisionally kept for Messiah’s advent. Alas! as we know they rejected Him to their own rejection, the call of the Gentiles following, till mercy take the Jews up again at the end of the age, and they fall at the feet of Jesus Messiah in glory, after manifold judgments, when “all Israel shall be saved.”

The Book of Esther

Woolwich, Tuesday Evening, March 18th, 1873

The Book of Esther is one of those few portions here and there of the word of God which are remarkable for the absence of His name. This has often surprised many: the Jews themselves were not able to understand it, and there are many Christians who are not much better; so much so, that it has been the habit, especially in these latter times, for some to treat the book with a certain measure of distrust, as if the absence of the name of the Lord were a just suspicion — as if it could not be of God because God’s name was not there. Now, I hope to show that it is a part of the excellence of the book that the name of God is not there; for there are occasions when God veils His glory. There is no occasion where He does not work, but He does not always permit His name to be heard, or His ways to be seen. I shall show that it is precisely what the character of the book requires — that the name of God should not be there; and this, therefore, instead of weakening the claim of Esther to its place in the holy volume, will rather show the perfectness of the ways of God, even in so exceptional a fact as the absence of His name in an entire book.

Esther

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