Deuteronomy

The Christian Home

The Importance of the Home

One of the ten reasons for the fall of the Roman Empire, given by the secular historian, Gibbons, was the break up of the family unit. The family unit is one of the most important institutions of our civilization. The bulwark of the nation is the united family. If the solidity and sanctity of the home disappears, then the nation disintegrates. The same is also true in regard to the assembly.

Children raised by godly parents will be the backbone of the future assembly. Our future leaders will come from homes like these. God, in His Trinitarian nature, should be known intimately in the Christian home. He should be revered and worshipped. The Lord Jesus should be the head of the household, not a quest.

Deuteronomy

Outline Of Deuteronomy

I. First Discourse of Moses (1:1—4:49). (Approaching the land)

        A. Introduction (1:1-5).

        B. Horeb to Kadesh (1:6-46).

        C. Kadesh to Heshbon (2:1-37).

        D. Transjordan secured (3:1-29).

        E. Exhortation to obedience (4:1-49).

II. Second Discourse of Moses (5:1—28:68).

(Purity in the land)

        A. Review of covenant made at Sinai (5:1-33).

        B. Warnings against disobedience (6:1-25).

        C. Instructions on dealing with idolatrous nations (7:1-26).

        D. Lessons from the past (8:1—11:7).

        E. Rewards for obedience (11:8-32).

        F. Statutes for worship (12:1-32).

        G. Punishment for false prophets and idolators (13:1-18).

        H. Foods clean and unclean (14:1-21).

        I. Tithes (14:22-29).

        J. Treatment of debtors and slaves (15:1-23).

        K. Feasts (16:1-22).

        L. Judges (17:1-13).

        M. Kings (17:14-20).

        N. Levites (18:1-8).

        O. Prophets (18:9-22).

        P. Criminal laws (19:1-21).

        Q. Warfare (20:1-20).

        R. Various laws (21:1—26:19).

        S. Curses and blessings (27:1—28:68).

III. Third Discourse of Moses (29:1—30:20).

(Covenant for the land)

Old Testament (Genesis-Deuteronomy)

Lesson 1: Creation
Genesis 1:1-31
Golden Text: 2 Corinthians 5:17

      I. Creation; V. 1.

1. The Time, “Beginning;” Cp. John 1:1-3; Proverbs 8.

2. The Person—God. Cp. Colossians 1:16-18.

3. The Act—“Created.” Hebrews wd. “Bara” = to create out of nothing. This word is used three times in Genesis 1 and marks the introduction of three great spheres of existence, (1) Of matter, v. 1; (2) of animal life, v. 21; (3) of spirit, v. 21.

II. Chaos; V. 2. The earth not created so. Isaiah 45:18 (“Vain” = without form). It became without form and void—perhaps thru fall of Satan. Isaiah 14:12-17. Note the condition of the earth—typical of state of the unsaved today.

1. Formless. No aim, no object in life, no definiteness. Job 14:4; Eccl. 9:3; Jeremiah 16:12; Romans 8:5-8; Philippians 2:21; Isaiah 57:20.

2. Void—empty, dissatisfied. Cp. Psalm 94:11; Ecc. 1:13; 2:11; Acts 14:15-17; Galatians 6:7-8; Jeremiah 2:13.

3. Dark. Cp. John 1:5; 3:19, 20; Ephesians 6:12; Colossians 1: 13; Acts 26:18; 2 Corinthians 4:3-4.

III. Restoration; Vs. 2-31. The stages of restoration illustrative of stages in new creation, or regeneration. John 3:3.

1. Chaos; V. 2. Cp. Psalms 14:2, 3; Isaiah 57:20; John 3:18-20; Isaiah 53:6; Romans 3:10-19.

2. The Spirit’s moving; V. 2. Conviction. Cp. John 16:8-11; Acts 2:18, 37, etc.

3. Light; V. 3. Cp. John 8:12; 2 Corinthians 4:6; Ephesians 5:8; 1 Peter 2:9; Psalm 119:130.

4. Division; Vs. 4-7. Cp. John 3:36; 7:43; 9:16; 10:19; 2 Corinthians 6:14-18; Leviticus 11:44-47.

Deuteronomy

Lectures Introductory to the Pentateuch. Deut. 1 - 16. In examining Exodus, Leviticus, and Numbers, we have found what may be called an abstract typical system. That is, we see in them a number of institutions laid down by Jehovah, the pattern of which was shown in the mount. These figures Moses was inspired to give as a whole to the people, entirely apart from the question whether they were or could be carried out according to the letter while passing through the wilderness. I have ca...

The Feasts in Deuteronomy 16

1. The Passover, In Verses 1-8.

The three great feasts of Jehovah here specified were instituted by Him for the express purpose of filling the hearts of His people with the enjoyment of Himself revealed in distinct blessings. If it was so in the letter for Israel, what is taught and conveyed to us, who have the substance of these earthly shadows! For all that God wrought or gave in the times that are past is but a little thing, compared with what the incarnate Son of God presented to Him in His person, and accomplished in His death, resurrection, and ascension, that the Holy Spirit might testify to the believer a blessedness worthy of the Father and the Son. Yet who could deny that these feasts were full of rich remembrance and rich promise of mercy? What a magnificent putting forth of divine power it was to bring Israel, a then nation of slaves, from under the greatest power at the time ruling on the earth! Nor in that deliverance was it merely power. There was a far deeper question before God. Israel, no less than the Egyptians, were a sinful race. How could God make light of their sins? Against all the gods of Egypt Jehovah was about to execute judgment. Pharaoh, who denied His title to claim Israel, must be publicly humbled and punished. But withal what about the sins of Israel? Therefore, while closing His preliminary blows upon guilty Egypt, God directed the last of them to fall on the firstborn sons of the Egyptians, from the king’s down to the maid’s behind the mill. How then was it with His people? Were they not as real sinners as the Egyptians? And would God make light of sin because they were His own? Is not Jehovah sanctified in those that are near Him? Does it not add immensely to the horribleness of sins in His sight when they break out in one that He chooses to Himself?

The Gentiles in relation to the Coming of the Lord

Lecture 3 - Deut. 32:8. This remarkable Scripture establishes a truth of the highest importance, often forgotten now, but continually assumed throughout the great mass of the prophecies of God. The people of Israel are the necessary centre in God’s plan for dealing with the nations of the earth. It is a thought not a little humbling and offensive to the Gentile mind; for men evince, even to this hour, in spite of many opposing tendencies in the days in which we live, the latent contempt...

Deuteronomy

Lectures Introductory to the Pentateuch. Deut. 1 - 16. In examining Exodus, Leviticus, and Numbers, we have found what may be called an abstract typical system. That is, we see in them a number of institutions laid down by Jehovah, the pattern of which was shown in the mount. These figures Moses was inspired to give as a whole to the people, entirely apart from the question whether they were or could be carried out according to the letter while passing through the wilderness. I have ca...

Deuteronomy

We now come to the Book of Deuteronomy, a book full of interest in its moral warnings as to testimony, but presenting fewer subjects for interpretation and exegesis than those, the summary of which we have hitherto sought to give. This book takes up Israel just on the borders of Canaan, and insists upon the faithful maintenance of their relationship with God, and on obedience to His commandments, as the only ground on which Israel can enter and continue therein, adding warnings as to the ...

Let Us Not Forsake the Gathering of Ourselves Together

Gather the people together, men and women and children, and the stranger that is within thy gates, that they may hear, and that they may learn, and fear the Lord your God, and observe to do all the words of this law; and that their children, who have not known it, may hear, and learn to fear the Lord your God, as long as ye live in the land whither ye go over Jordan to possess it (Deut. 31:12,13)     Two things in the foregoing passage claim our special attention: ...

The Unequal Yoke

The Unequal Yoke. C. H. Mackintosh. Preface. The following paper appeared in a recent number of "The Present Testimony;" but, inasmuch as that periodical is out of the reach of a large number of Christian readers, I have been requested by many, in various places, to send it forth, in the form of a separate tract. One shrinks from multiplying books at a time like the present, when it may, in good truth, be said, "of making of books there is no end;" still, if the enemy is making diligent use...
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