Daniel

Author's Introduction And Key To The Chart

The chart accompanying this volume is a reproduction of a large one used when the content matter of this book was delivered as lectures. Careful study of the diagram will help to clarify the structure of the book of Daniel, especially to those who are unfamiliar with prophetic teaching.

As we begin this study I want you to notice the title of the chart— “Outline of the book of Daniel the Prophet.” I call attention to the name given to Daniel, because it was given to him by our Lord Jesus Himself in Matthew 24:15 and in Mark 13:14. There we find Him warning His disciples concerning the setting up of “the abomination of desolation, spoken of by Daniel the prophet”(italics added).

Some critics deny that there was a prophet Daniel. They declare that it is utterly impossible to believe that Daniel lived in the days of Nebuchadnezzar, Darius, and Cyrus, and yet wrote a book which told of all these world empires before any of them, except the first two, had come into existence. Daniel, these learned teachers tell us, was simply a romancer who lived over 200 years later and wrote his so-called prophecies after they had all become history.

As a simple believer, I owe everything for eternity to what the blessed Christ of God accomplished on Calvary’s cross. I prefer to accept His testimony, even if it is in opposition to all the wise men of the day. He declared that Daniel was a prophet. He did not speak of Daniel the historian, Daniel the romancer, or Daniel the novelist but Daniel the prophet—Daniel the man who had enlightenment by the Spirit of God. Therefore he could speak of the things that were not as though they were. I stand for the full inspiration of all the reputed Word of God, and therefore, of the book of Daniel.

Introductory Notes by Arno C. Gaebelein

Revised Edition Introductory Notes by Arno C. Gaebelein Daniel © 1996 by Loizeaux Brothers, Inc. Neptune, New Jersey First Edition, 1911 Second Edition, 1920 Revised Edition, 1996 Unless otherwise indicated, Scripture quotations are taken from the King James version of the Bible. Introductory Notes are taken from Gaebelein’s Concise Commentary on the Whole Bible, ©1970, 1985 by Loizeaux Brothers, Inc., and also reference the main commentary. Introductory Notes ...

Preface To The Revised Edition

H. A. Ironside’s commentary on Daniel was first published in 1911. As might be expected in an exposition of prophetic Scripture, the author examined Bible prophecy in the light of then-current events and wove his observations into the commentary. Decades later some readers find certain of these references a bit puzzling. During preparation of this third edition we considered the possibility of eliminating or modifying observations that might be considered particularly dated. Ultimately ...

Chapter Seven Four Great World Empires

We now enter on the second part of the book of Daniel. In chapter 7 we have a new beginning, as you will readily see by referring to the chart, even though this chapter covers practically the same ground as chapter 2. It takes in the whole course of the times of the Gentiles; it begins with Babylon and ends in the overthrow of all derived authority and the establishment of the kingdom of the Son of man. But the difference between the first and second divisions is this: The first division is ...

Chapter Six The Faithful Remnant

The interesting historical incident in Daniel 6 portrays what should be comforting for every trusting soul: God’s tender care over all who walk uprightly before Him and confide in His love and power. Like the previous events it also has a typical character; it illustrates the peculiarly trying position in which the faithful remnant of Judah will find themselves in the days of the antichrist. Darius, the satrap of Babylon, was pleased to set a hundred and twenty princes over the kingdom;...

Chapter Seven Four Great World Empires

We now enter on the second part of the book of Daniel. In chapter 7 we have a new beginning, as you will readily see by referring to the chart, even though this chapter covers practically the same ground as chapter 2. It takes in the whole course of the times of the Gentiles; it begins with Babylon and ends in the overthrow of all derived authority and the establishment of the kingdom of the Son of man. But the difference between the first and second divisions is this: The first division is ...

Author Biography

Henry Allan Ironside, one of the twentieth century’s greatest preachers, was born in Toronto, Canada, on October 14, 1876. He lived his life by faith; his needs at crucial moments were met in the most remarkable ways. Though his classes stopped with grammar school, his fondness for reading and an incredibly retentive memory put learning to use. His scholarship was well recognized in academic circles with Wheaton College awarding an honorary Litt. D. in 1930 and Bob Jones University an h...

Appendix Questions And Objections Answered

A multitude of questions and objections were handed to the author and answered or replied to when lecturing on this book. A selection of those that might pose difficulties to others has been made here, together with abbreviated notes of the answers given. Only those bearing directly on the themes treated in Daniel have been preserved. 1. Is it the antichrist or the Roman little horn who will make the seven-years covenant with the Jews? In a sense, both; for while the little horn is “...

Chapter Twelve The Time Of The End

This final chapter is intimately connected with the activity of the previous chapter. “At that time”—that is, at the time of the rise of the antichrist and the overthrow of the Assyrian or king of the North—“shall Michael stand up, the great prince which standeth for the children of thy [Daniel’s] people” (1). There is very likely a close connection here with what we have recorded in Revelation 12. There John sees war in Heaven. The dragon and his angels fight to maintain their...

Chapter Eleven A Warning To God's People

Part One: The Wars Of The Ptolemies And The Seleucids

In taking up the first part of Daniel 11 (verses 1-35), I want to emphasize again the words of the apostle Paul that “all scripture is given by inspiration of God and is profitable” (2 Timothy 3:16, italics added). For in seeking to expand this particular portion I will need to deal almost entirely with a period in history covering about 200 years in connection with the wars that desolated the land of Palestine after the death of Alexander the Great. This may seem very dry and unspiritual to some, but the subject demands this kind of treatment to be made clear. I feel sure if this history is carefully noted it will help many see as never before the absolute unerring precision of God’s holy Word.

We have been given a record that was first made in Heaven; God intended us to study it and to understand it, or He would not have included it in the volume of Scripture. In order to understand it we must take some pains, for it is a portion of the Word that we cannot clearly comprehend unless we take the trouble to investigate and see how it has been fulfilled. For those who decry the study of historical and other subjects in connection with the Word of God, I would mention again the pregnant sentence that “All history is His story.” Surely the man of God can gain much by observing how remarkably history confirms prophecy and sets its seal on the divine inspiration of the Bible. The Holy Spirit never condemns our acquiring the knowledge of this world. It is the wisdom of this world that is set aside as untrustworthy and causing strife and speculation. We are warned against human philosophy, against the reasoning of the human mind uninstructed by divine illumination. But we are not warned against the acquisition of true knowledge if we couple it with the fear of God and the love of the Spirit.

Syndicate content