3 John

The Third Epistle Of John

1. The elder unto Gaius the beloved, whom I love in truth.

2. Beloved, I pray that in all things thou mayest prosper and be in health, even as thy soul prosperth.

3. For I rejoice greatly when brethren came and bare witness unto thy truth, even as thou walkest in truth.

4. Greater joy have I none than this, to hear of my children walking in the truth.

5. Beloved, thou doest a faithful work in whatsoever thou doest toward them that are brethren and strangers withal.

6. Who bare witness to thy love before the church; whom thou wilt do well to set forward on their journey worthily of God.

7. Because that for the sake of the Name they went forth, taking nothing of the Gentiles.

8. We therefore ought to welcome such, that we may be fellow-workers for the truth.

9. I wrote somewhat unto the church, but Diotrephes, who loveth to have the preeminence among them, receiveth us not.

10. Therefore, if I come, I will bring to remembrance his works which he doeth, prating against us with wicked words; and not content therewith, neither doth he himself receive the brethren, and them that would he forbiddeth and casteth them out of the church.

11. Beloved, imitate not that which is evil, but that which is good. He that doeth good is of God; he that doeth evil hath not seen God.

12. Demetrius hath the witness of all men, and of the truth itself; yea, we also bear witness, and thou knowest that our witness is true.

13. I had many things to write unto thee, but I am unwilling to write them to thee with ink and pen.

14. But I hope shortly to see thee, and we shall speak face to face. Peace be unto thee. Thy friends salute thee. Salute the friends by name.

Preface & Introduction

The American Revised Version of the Scriptures has been employed as the text of these Epistles rather than the familiar King James Authorized Version. There are many delicate shades of thought in this important portion of God’s Word—perhaps more than in almost any other book of the New Testament—which are lost or confused in the Authorized Version. There are truths here, as Peter says in regard to Paul’s writings—2 Peter 3:16—“hard to be understood, and which they that are unlearned and unstable wrest, as they do also the other scriptures, to their own destruction.” I have endeavored to avail myself of the help supplied by various translators of the Bible, to arrive at the most correct interpretation of the precious (and by no means easily understood or explained) truths of these letters from the pen of the beloved Apostle John. It is with the earnest hope and prayer that this commentary may supply a simple view of the deep truths in these Epistles that it is being sent forth. If the reader derives as much blessing from the reading as the author has from the writing of it, he will be well repaid.

Yours in our Lord,
August Van Ryn

Introduction To The Epistles

Before entering upon the detailed study of these wonderful Epistles of John, let us consider briefly the distinctive ministry of the three most prominent writers of the New Testament, that portion of God’s Word as penned by inspiration by Peter, Paul and John. I am borrowing most of what immediately follows from another.1

New Testament (Acts-Revelation)

Lesson 221: The Ascension Of Christ
Acts 1:1-11
Golden Text: Acts 1:11

I. The Great Commission. Matthew 28:18-20; Mark 16:15, 10.

1. The Person Who gave it. He had the right by virtue of His Person and His work.

2. The power for it—“Himself;” v. 18. Note the “power” as seen in (1) His birth; Luke 1:35. (2) Ministry; Luke 4:32. (3) Miracles; Luke 4:36. (4) Forgiveness; Matthew 9:6. (5) Death; John 10:18. (6) Resurrection. Romans 1:4; Colossians 2:13-15. (7) Ascension; Ephesians 1:20. (8) Coming; Matthew 24:30.

3. The plan of it. (1) The command “go ye.” (2) The scope, “world.” (3) The theme, “the Gospel.” (4) The persons, “every creature.”

4. The persons to whom given—His disciples. (1) Chosen. Mark 3:14; John 15:16. (2) Saved; Matthew 16:16. (3) Taught. (4) Commissioned. (5) Equipped.

5. The privilege of it. Ambassadors, co-workers, witnesses, trustees, servants of the Lord Jesus Christ.

6. The price of it. “Go” means leave. Cp. Luke 14:26.

7. The promise with it. “I am with you.” Cp Hebrews 13:5.

II. The Promise. Acts 1:4, 5.

1. Promised in O. T. Isaiah 32:15; Jeremiah 31:33; Ezek 11:19; Joel 228.

2. Promised in N. T. John 15:26—16:14.

III. The Questioning Disciples. Vs. 6-8.

1. The question; v. 6. (1) An earthly kingdom expected; Isaiah 2:2-4. (2) The King being rejected, the kingdom is in obeyance. Luke 19:14; Acts 3:14. (3) He will yet be King over the Earth; Psalm 2.

3 John

The third epistle encourages the believer to the exercise of hospitality, whether towards the known brethren or strangers, and to all benevolent care in furthering their journey when departing, provided that they come with the truth and for the truth’s sake without salary or provision. Gaius received them, as it appears, and was helpful to them both in his own house and on their journey. Diotrephes, on the contrary, did not love these strangers, who went about, it is said, without a formal...

James - Jude

Epistle Of James. Why should the Revisers perpetuate the traditional blunder of “The General Epistle of James”? The best critics drop καθολική, following B K, A C being defective, but A also dropping it at the end: so many Latin copies, and the Pesch. Syr. It is not “general,” but specially addressed to the twelve tribes. James 1:1 has neither the closeness of a literal rendering, nor the freedom of the Authorised Version. If we are to adhere to the letter, it is in...

Address 20 - 3 John 1-14

The Third Epistle Of John “The elder to the beloved Gaius [or, Caius] whom I love in truth. Beloved, I desire that in all things thou shouldest prosper and be in health, even as thy soul prospereth. For I rejoiced exceedingly when brethren came and bore witness to thy truth, even as thou walkest in truth. I have no greater joy than these things, that I hear of my children walking in the truth. Beloved, thou doest a faithful thing whatsoever thou mayest do unto the brethren and this stra...

Preface and Introduction

With a new version. Preface. The Christian reader will, I trust, bear with a few words rather personal. For no one living has nearer or deeper reasons to praise God for these Epistles than he who presents this exposition. The First of the Three was exceedingly blessed to his soul more than sixty years ago. He had been converted to God without human instrumentality, but was still cast down under the sense of indwelling sin. The witness of God in 1 John 5:9, 10, was suggested by a Chris...

The Epistles of John

The Epistles of John have evidently a character altogether peculiar to themselves. Christ Himself personally is more before us than in any other of the inspired epistles. Nevertheless there is this difference between the Gospel and the Epistles of John: that his gospel necessarily treats of Christ in a direct and immediate way, and then the provision that He made, when He was about to leave the world and His disciples in it, by the Holy Ghost taking His place down here (these being the two c...

3 John

The Third Epistle encourages the believer to the exercise of hospitality, whether towards the known brethren or strangers, and to all benevolent care in furthering their journey when departing, provided that they come with the truth and for the truth's sake without salary or provision. Gaius received them as it appears. and was helpful to them both in his own house and on their journey. Diotrephes, on the contrary, did not love these strangers, who went about, it is said, without a formal missio...

3 John

In certain features the third Epistle of John is very like his second, yet in its main theme it is the converse, and at the same time the complement, of the second, as we shall see. Like the second it is an epistle of a private nature, yet containing in its brief verses instruction of such an important kind that the Spirit of God has seen it needful to give it a permanent niche in the inspired Word. We cannot say with any certainty whether Gaius, to whom it was written, is to be id...
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