2 Peter

Chapter 1

“Simon Peter, a servant and an apostle.” In the First Epistle he calls himself an apostle only, but here a bond-servant, putting himself alongside of others serving the same Lord amid the apostasy of the last days. There is no clerical assumption here, only a servant getting down to help others (Matt. 20:27, 28), teaching what a servant should be and do. “Righteousness through our Saviour-God.” “Grace and peace multiplied through the knowledge of God and of Jesus our Lord.” Peter...

Chapter 2

Here we have traced in solemn words by the Spirit, the decline and corruption of the professing Church, the means by which it is accomplished, and the doom of those who are the chief agents in this Satanic work. More awful picture than is here given, more fearful tones than those in which the doom of such is recorded, are not found in the Word of God. In Peter’s First Epistle, the enemy appears as a roaring lion persecuting: in this Second Epistle as a serpent seducing. There he is with...

Chapter 3

The second epistles abound with instructions for the last days, giving special guidance and warning to God’s saints as to how they may keep themselves in separation from the apostasy and please God. In Chapter 2 we had the ecclesiastical apostasy with its clerical assumption; here we have the infidel apostasy, the scoffer’s sneer and the denial of the truth. To meet this evil and fortify the true saints against it, Peter writes to stir up those whom he knew to be real, whose minds were p...

The First Epistle of Peter Introduction

Peter’s line of things is different from Paul’s. Peter was a witness of the sufferings of Christ, and also a partaker of the glory (see 1 Peter 5:1). Paul was a witness of the glory (Acts 22:14-15), and a partaker of the sufferings (Col. 1:24: Phil. 3:10). Paul’s theme is the heavenlies: Peter’s theme the wilderness. In the Epistle to the Ephesians, believers are seen as already in the heavenlies, there blessed with all spiritual blessings. In the First Epistle of Peter, the...

Chapter 1

Peter addresses the saints as “strangers scattered.” Paul’s word is “no more strangers” (Eph. 2:19.) Up there in heaven, we are at home; down here, “strangers,” no longer at home in the world. Every true Christian knows this, and the more he is in the Spirit, and living in the presence of God, the more shall he feel this stranger-ship. “Scattered,” or more exactly rendered—“strangers of the dispersion”—the same as in James 1:1—which shows that this Epistle was pri...

James - Jude

Epistle Of James. Why should the Revisers perpetuate the traditional blunder of “The General Epistle of James”? The best critics drop καθολική, following B K, A C being defective, but A also dropping it at the end: so many Latin copies, and the Pesch. Syr. It is not “general,” but specially addressed to the twelve tribes. James 1:1 has neither the closeness of a literal rendering, nor the freedom of the Authorised Version. If we are to adhere to the letter, it is in...

Glory and Virtue

(B.T. Vol. 13, p. 12-14.)

2 Peter 1:3

The Day Star - 2 Peter 1:19

(Pub. Weston, Chapter Two Archive.)

Many Christians are averse to God’s revelation of the future. This is to be sadly prejudiced. Having known countless theories made and explained away, they consider it wiser to seek simply the blessing of their own souls. They may be right, if they have not yet peace and liberty, as Christians are entitled to by grace. But if they are Christians, they have Christ ; and all things are theirs. It is not wise or well to turn away from Him that speaks concerning the future, because men have often made mistakes. If I am to give up all that has been perverted, I am in danger of turning away from almost all the Bible.

Beyond controversy, on the other hand, not a few, being really unestablished in Christ, are apt to be taken up with prophecy in a light manner. They seem on the alert for things to suit their preconceptions. They start in quest of the Buonapartes, of the “last” Pope in their own day, of their country’s destiny, etc. They are thus liable to deceive themselves as well as others. But, if we have confidence in God, and Christ be before our hearts, we shall not fail of the Spirit’s guidance, through Whom, bowing to the word, we shall get the truth of things. When we have Christ as our object, the truth shines; for He is the true Light which makes all things manifest. Self only darkens everything. The love of God and of his neighbour was put clearly before the man that asked the Lord who his neighbour was. Our neighbour is whoever wants us and our help. If our eye be single, we shall soon know; then too we have a heart for God’s will.

2 Peter 3

From the humbling and awful indictment of false teachers in 2 Peter 2 beginning to play their corrupting part in Christendom, as the false prophets had wrought the ruin of Israel in the past, the apostle turns to speak of this Second Epistle, and its aim in the grace of God. But even so, as we shall soon see, he has to warn of another daring snare to be, and a wholly different class of adversaries. “This already a second epistle, beloved, I write to you, in both which I stir up your pur...

2 Peter 2

The apostle turns to the first of the evil classes among those of the circumcision who, if not now, had once professed the Lord’s name; the class of corruption in word and deed (2). 2 Peter 3 deals with the philosophic and sceptical class. “But there were false prophets also among the people, as there shall be also false teachers among you, such as shall bring in by-the-bye sects of perdition, denying even the Sovereign Master that bought them, bringing on themselves swift perdition; ...
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