1 Thessalonians

Chapter One Divine Retribution

Paul’s first Epistle to the Thessalonians dealt largely with the coming of the Lord Jesus Christ for His saints. Evidently some Christians in Thessalonica misunderstood the teaching in that letter. They seem to have jumped to the conclusion that since the Lord’s coming might take place at any moment, it was useless for them to work for a living. And since they were going through some very trying and distressing experiences, they thought that perhaps they were already entering the great t...

Everlasting Consolation

Chapter Two Everlasting Consolation The Rise of the Antichrist (2 Thessalonians 2:1-12) As we begin to consider the special line of truth that is the subject of this passage, we need to remind ourselves that the outstanding theme of the first Epistle to the Thessalonians is the coming of the Lord Jesus Christ to receive His own before the onset of the awful period of judgment that is designated in the Old Testament as the day of the Lord, a time of trouble, or the time of Jacob’s t...

Chapter Three Christianity In Practice

Five Themes (2 Thessalonians 3:1-5) In these five verses the apostle sought to impress on the hearts of the young Thessalonian Christians—and every one of us—some thoughts on the following five topics. 1. Prayerfulness. In verse 1 the Thessalonians were asked to remember in prayer the one who wrote this letter. He was the mightiest evangelist, missionary, and teacher of the Word that the church of God has ever known, yet he felt the need of the prayers of these converts so that he ...

Author Biography

Henry Allan Ironside, one of the twentieth century’s greatest preachers, was born in Toronto, Canada, on October 14,1876. He lived his life by faith; his needs at crucial moments were met in the most remarkable ways. Though his classes stopped with grammar school, his fondness for reading and an incredibly retentive memory put learning to use. His scholarship was well recognized in academic circles with Wheaton College awarding an honorary Lift. D. in 1930 and Bob Jones University an ho...

First Epistle To The Thessalonians

Kilmarnock, Scotland: John Ritchie, Publisher Of Christian Literature First Epistle to the Thessalonians Introduction There are three leading lines of truth in the New Testament Epistles, as given by the inspired writers, Paul, Peter, and John. Paul deals with the Gospel of God, the heavenly calling, the seating of the saints with Christ in the heavenlies, and the Church. Peter views the children of God as down here in the wilderness, passing along to the rest beyond, guard...

Appendix

The Order of Events. (1 Thess. 4:16, 17.) First, the Lord Himself, the Son of God, descends with “a shout”—a signal to His own, as the Greek word signifies. It will not be understood by the world. When the risen Christ spoke to Saul, he alone heard and understood the words spoken (Acts 22:9), others only heard a sound (Acts 9:7). “My sheep hear My voice” (John 10:27). “The voice of the Archangel”—for it will bear on the destinies of earth. “The trump of God”

The Second Epistle To The Thessalonians

Chapter 1 Verse 1.—“Paul and Silvanus and Timotheus, the church of the Thessalonians, in God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.” Has God any particular lesson to teach us from that expression? Instead of saying, “The Church in Thessalonica.” He says, “Church of the Thessalonians.” It looks almost as if they were about just to be taken from the world altogether. There is only one other place like it, and that has a very different meaning. In Col. 4:16. “The Church of the...

1 Thessalonians - Hebrews

1 Thessalonians. In this Epistle the critical changes are few. In 1 Thess. 1:1 “from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.” Origen expressly noted the words as not read in his day, though they are supported by the Sinaitic, Alexandrian, and many other good MSS and versions, etc. B F G and the best versions reject the words. — There are slight corrections in verses 8 and 10. In 1 Thess. 2:2 an expletive καί is expunged, as also γάρ in verse 9. — There is a...

1 Thessalonians

The Epistles of Paul to the Thessalonians.

Preface.

It will not be denied by any considerate Christian of intelligence that there is room and need for fresh help in studying these earliest Epistles of the great apostle. The Homilies of Chrysostom, even if available generally, consist chiefly of exhortation. The comments among Jerome’s works, were they certain, are of the slightest account, and avowedly supposititious.

Passing over the regular commentators, such as Calvin and others, Bishop Jewell has in his works an exposition upon these two Epistles, which reflects his characteristic ability, eloquence. and learning, his solid piety and earnestness, with the deepest abhorrence of Popery, of all Christian or quasi-Christian systems the most offensive to God and the most perilous to man. As the Bishop of Salisbury died in September, 1571, this work was posthumous, the original edition in 8vo. having the date 1583, the second 1594, and not appearing in the folio collections, but of course in the more modern edd. of his works, the Parker Society series, etc. The version of the N. T. followed is that of Geneva; there is no evidence of critical research into the disputed questions of text or translation; but that familiarity with the fathers and ecclesiastical history shines, for which the author was as renowned as Abp. Ussher at a later date.

First And Second Thessalonians

There is a special interest in examining the epistles to the Thessalonians, more particularly the first, because, in point of fact, it was the earliest of the letters of the apostles; and as the first on the part of Paul, so also to an assembly found in the freshness of its faith, and in the endurance of no small suffering for Jesus’ sake. This has given a colour to the character of the epistle. Besides, the very truth which most strongly characterized the assembly there — the habitual w...
Syndicate content