1 Peter

Chapter 1

Peter addresses the saints as “strangers scattered.” Paul’s word is “no more strangers” (Eph. 2:19.) Up there in heaven, we are at home; down here, “strangers,” no longer at home in the world. Every true Christian knows this, and the more he is in the Spirit, and living in the presence of God, the more shall he feel this stranger-ship. “Scattered,” or more exactly rendered—“strangers of the dispersion”—the same as in James 1:1—which shows that this Epistle was pri...

Chapter 2

Here we have traced in solemn words by the Spirit, the decline and corruption of the professing Church, the means by which it is accomplished, and the doom of those who are the chief agents in this Satanic work. More awful picture than is here given, more fearful tones than those in which the doom of such is recorded, are not found in the Word of God. In Peter’s First Epistle, the enemy appears as a roaring lion persecuting: in this Second Epistle as a serpent seducing. There he is with...

Chapter 4

The opening verses of this chapter are a continuation of the truths taught at the close of chapter 3, the practical application of them to us. Read in this light, their obscurity disappears. “Forasmuch, then, as Christ hath suffered for us in the flesh,” is an allusion to chap. 3:18: “Arm yourselves likewise with the same mind,” a reference to chapter 3:17. He, according to the will of God, suffered for sin, He was assailed at all points, tempted to turn aside, to shirk the Cross,...

Chapter 5

The allusion in the opening words of this chapter is to the threefold charge given to Peter by the Risen Lord, on the shore of the Lake of Galilee. “Lovest thou Me?” then “Feed My lambs,” “Shepherd My young sheep.” “Feed my sheep.” This, for many years he had done, and now as the aged apostle, soon to end his labours and depart to be with Christ, as had been foretold him, he passes on the charge and exhorts others to continue the same work, for it is not the will of God that ...

The Second Epistle of Peter Introduction

The Second Epistles have a special bearing on the last days, and give direction to the people and servants of God how they are to act in the midst of ever-increasing apostasy and departure from God and His Word. In the First Epistle we have seen the saints in the wilderness suffering for righteousness, with the devil as a roaring lion seeking to devour. Here the same devil appears in the garb of “an angel of light” (2 Cor. 11:14), not persecuting but deceiving and seducing by means of th...

Chapter 1

“Simon Peter, a servant and an apostle.” In the First Epistle he calls himself an apostle only, but here a bond-servant, putting himself alongside of others serving the same Lord amid the apostasy of the last days. There is no clerical assumption here, only a servant getting down to help others (Matt. 20:27, 28), teaching what a servant should be and do. “Righteousness through our Saviour-God.” “Grace and peace multiplied through the knowledge of God and of Jesus our Lord.” Peter...

Chapter 3

The second epistles abound with instructions for the last days, giving special guidance and warning to God’s saints as to how they may keep themselves in separation from the apostasy and please God. In Chapter 2 we had the ecclesiastical apostasy with its clerical assumption; here we have the infidel apostasy, the scoffer’s sneer and the denial of the truth. To meet this evil and fortify the true saints against it, Peter writes to stir up those whom he knew to be real, whose minds were p...

The First Epistle of Peter Introduction

Peter’s line of things is different from Paul’s. Peter was a witness of the sufferings of Christ, and also a partaker of the glory (see 1 Peter 5:1). Paul was a witness of the glory (Acts 22:14-15), and a partaker of the sufferings (Col. 1:24: Phil. 3:10). Paul’s theme is the heavenlies: Peter’s theme the wilderness. In the Epistle to the Ephesians, believers are seen as already in the heavenlies, there blessed with all spiritual blessings. In the First Epistle of Peter, the...

James - Jude

Epistle Of James. Why should the Revisers perpetuate the traditional blunder of “The General Epistle of James”? The best critics drop καθολική, following B K, A C being defective, but A also dropping it at the end: so many Latin copies, and the Pesch. Syr. It is not “general,” but specially addressed to the twelve tribes. James 1:1 has neither the closeness of a literal rendering, nor the freedom of the Authorised Version. If we are to adhere to the letter, it is in...

1 Peter 5

Now the apostle turns to such as took the lead in governmental care among the saints, as he had already exhorted gifted persons (1 Peter 4:10, 11), after urging the more general call to fervent love and ungrudging hospitality (8, 9). “Elders [therefore] that [are] among you I exhort that [am] fellow-elder, and witness of the sufferings of Christ, that [am] also partaker of the glory about to be revealed. Tend (or, shepherd) the flock of God that [is; among you, exercising oversight,31 n...
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