William Lincoln

Chapter 3

The second epistles abound with instructions for the last days, giving special guidance and warning to God’s saints as to how they may keep themselves in separation from the apostasy and please God. In Chapter 2 we had the ecclesiastical apostasy with its clerical assumption; here we have the infidel apostasy, the scoffer’s sneer and the denial of the truth. To meet this evil and fortify the true saints against it, Peter writes to stir up those whom he knew to be real, whose minds were p...

The First Epistle of Peter Introduction

Peter’s line of things is different from Paul’s. Peter was a witness of the sufferings of Christ, and also a partaker of the glory (see 1 Peter 5:1). Paul was a witness of the glory (Acts 22:14-15), and a partaker of the sufferings (Col. 1:24: Phil. 3:10). Paul’s theme is the heavenlies: Peter’s theme the wilderness. In the Epistle to the Ephesians, believers are seen as already in the heavenlies, there blessed with all spiritual blessings. In the First Epistle of Peter, the...

The Second Epistle of Peter Introduction

The Second Epistles have a special bearing on the last days, and give direction to the people and servants of God how they are to act in the midst of ever-increasing apostasy and departure from God and His Word. In the First Epistle we have seen the saints in the wilderness suffering for righteousness, with the devil as a roaring lion seeking to devour. Here the same devil appears in the garb of “an angel of light” (2 Cor. 11:14), not persecuting but deceiving and seducing by means of th...

The Church: Her Exalted Position and Calling.

Kilmarnock: John Ritchie, Publisher of Christian Literature. London: W. G. Wheeler & Co., 17 Paternoster Row. The Church: Her Exalted Position and Calling. The mode in which the epistle to the Romans is concluded is suggestive; for there is a hint there, in a singular way appended, concerning the revelation of some mystery, which, it is stated, had hitherto been kept secret ever since the world began. What can this mystery be? Undoubtedly something most blessed; for God’s ...

The Assembly of God: Its Divine Centre and Constitution.

Three chapters in the Gospel by Matthew specially treat of the gathering together of God’s saints and of the Divine Centre to which God, by His Spirit, gathers. Chapter 16, on the Lord’s own testimony, is the case of an individual soul taught of the Father, confessing Him as “the Christ, the Son of the Living God.” To this He at once makes reply: “Thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church.” The confession of this heaven-instructed one is in two parts : first, a...

The Assembly of God: Its Fellowship and Worship.

Each Epistle has a distinct subject. Romans is the inspired presentation of the Gospel. Ephesians exhibits the Church’s position in heaven, 1 Corinthians shews the assembly in responsibility on earth. Whilst Romans discloses the antitype of the passover (to 5:11), and of the passage of the Red Sea to end of 8; Ephesians shows the passage of the Jordan, and our abode in Canaan. Then in between these two there aptly intervene Galatians, which warns us of those teachers who would put us under...

The True Ground of God's Assembly.

A most important lesson may be learnt from the contrast between the golden candlestick, as in the tabernacle and in the temple of old, with the seven golden candlesticks, among which the Lord has been seen walking as described in Revelation 1 But, before we draw this contrast, let us briefly show that this contrast is designed of the Lord. The ground-plan of the book of Revelation is a sacred chamber, like to the tabernacle of old. Every piece of furniture to be found in the one is to be ...

Separation to God.

Separation to God, and from the world, especially in its religion, is the way of the Lord. This He has in His Word commanded and called His people in all ages to obey. Yet in nothing has full obedience been less known. The enemy has ever sought to blot out the line of demarcation between the saved and the unsaved, never more so than at the present time. The death of the Lord Jesus had this object among others, to deliver His redeemed from the present evil world (Gal. 1:4), that they mi...

Babylon.

It is no uncommon thing to blunt and turn aside all the admonitions given by God to His people in regard to their separation from Babylon, by suggesting that the term refers alone to Popery. And so all the denunciations of impending woe on that huge system are handed over to Romanists, while a large part of professing Christendom, lulled by this as by a powerful soporific, continues slumbering, and in its dreams congratulating itself that all is right as it should be with it, seeing it is ou...

Clerisy: The Origin, Character, Progress, and End.

In the Acts of the Apostles we are presented with an inspired picture of the early Church, in her unity and power, as God’s witness on the earth. As the word “Church” imports, those who compose it are a people “called out” from the world, and at its first formation and spread, this line was maintained very markedly. Soon after the departure of the apostles, grevious wolves obtained entrance to the flock, who sought their own gain and honour, and as they gradually rose into a distin...
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