William Lincoln

Summary of the Epistle

In Philippians, God has placed a glorious object before the saint, and enjoined a godly carelessness about all else, so that that object may be won. Sin is not mentioned in the Epistle. Joy and rejoicing are mentioned sixteen times. To be faithful is to be joyful. Devoted Christians who follow the Lord fully, are a rejoicing people. Philippians shews us how we are to apprehend that for which we are apprehended by Christ Jesus. It views the believer as pressing on towards the mark for

Chapter 4

“Therefore my brethren.” This verse properly closes chapter 3. It is the practical lesson that the Holy Ghost draws from the fact that we are looking for the Lord Jesus to come from heaven. Are you expecting such a Saviour? Do you live in the hope of being in His presence any moment, all together? “Therefore—stand fast in the Lord.” Do not give up your confidence, or slacken in your obedience. “Stand fast in the Lord,” He owns you, controls you: let His will alone be your law. ...

Appendix

The Order of Events. (1 Thess. 4:16, 17.) First, the Lord Himself, the Son of God, descends with “a shout”—a signal to His own, as the Greek word signifies. It will not be understood by the world. When the risen Christ spoke to Saul, he alone heard and understood the words spoken (Acts 22:9), others only heard a sound (Acts 9:7). “My sheep hear My voice” (John 10:27). “The voice of the Archangel”—for it will bear on the destinies of earth. “The trump of God”

Chapter 1

Peter addresses the saints as “strangers scattered.” Paul’s word is “no more strangers” (Eph. 2:19.) Up there in heaven, we are at home; down here, “strangers,” no longer at home in the world. Every true Christian knows this, and the more he is in the Spirit, and living in the presence of God, the more shall he feel this stranger-ship. “Scattered,” or more exactly rendered—“strangers of the dispersion”—the same as in James 1:1—which shows that this Epistle was pri...

Chapter 2

The opening words of this chapter are connected with what has gone before. Verse 1.—“Wherefore, laying aside all malice.” “Seeing ye have purified yourselves” (chap. 1:22), put away these unclean and fleshly things. Being pure, we are to purify ourselves. The former is our position, the latter ought to be our practice. The new birth gives a new life, the Spirit indwells the children of God, the effect is they love one another. But the flesh would oppose this, if it had its way. ...

Chapter 3

Here we get instruction from God on many details of life and conduct. God’s Word is very full not only of great principles, but of practical details, given in order that the man of God may be “throughly furnished unto all good works” (2 Tim. 3:17). “Wives” are first addressed. Here, as elsewhere, in grace, God begins with the weaker vessel. Subjection is the woman’s place, not only when she has a good husband, but even when he is unconverted. The case here, does not imply that...

Chapter 4

The opening verses of this chapter are a continuation of the truths taught at the close of chapter 3, the practical application of them to us. Read in this light, their obscurity disappears. “Forasmuch, then, as Christ hath suffered for us in the flesh,” is an allusion to chap. 3:18: “Arm yourselves likewise with the same mind,” a reference to chapter 3:17. He, according to the will of God, suffered for sin, He was assailed at all points, tempted to turn aside, to shirk the Cross,...

Chapter 5

The allusion in the opening words of this chapter is to the threefold charge given to Peter by the Risen Lord, on the shore of the Lake of Galilee. “Lovest thou Me?” then “Feed My lambs,” “Shepherd My young sheep.” “Feed my sheep.” This, for many years he had done, and now as the aged apostle, soon to end his labours and depart to be with Christ, as had been foretold him, he passes on the charge and exhorts others to continue the same work, for it is not the will of God that ...

Chapter 1

“Simon Peter, a servant and an apostle.” In the First Epistle he calls himself an apostle only, but here a bond-servant, putting himself alongside of others serving the same Lord amid the apostasy of the last days. There is no clerical assumption here, only a servant getting down to help others (Matt. 20:27, 28), teaching what a servant should be and do. “Righteousness through our Saviour-God.” “Grace and peace multiplied through the knowledge of God and of Jesus our Lord.” Peter...

Chapter 2

Here we have traced in solemn words by the Spirit, the decline and corruption of the professing Church, the means by which it is accomplished, and the doom of those who are the chief agents in this Satanic work. More awful picture than is here given, more fearful tones than those in which the doom of such is recorded, are not found in the Word of God. In Peter’s First Epistle, the enemy appears as a roaring lion persecuting: in this Second Epistle as a serpent seducing. There he is with...
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