Robert C. Chapman

Chapter Four Changes

Although he was the pastor of a Strict Baptist chapel, Mr. Chapman had never been a Strict Baptist. This fact was well-understood by the people of “Ebenezer” when they invited him to undertake the pastorate. He was firmly convinced that the baptism of believers by immersion was the only true mode, but he also held that differences of judgment on this point should not prevent fellowship between truly converted persons. So in coming to “Ebenezer” he laid down one condition. Years after...

Chapter Three Early days at Barnstaple

It was a twenty-four hour journey from London to Barnstaple in 1832. As Chapman neared his journey’s end he could see the town stretched out beneath him on a bend of the River Taw. It was practically flat, for it had been built on a marsh within a basin of hills. The steeple of the parish church rose above the jumble of crooked roofs which made up the old town. He could tell by the ships’ masts where were the Great and Little Quays, Castle Quay, and Mill End Quay. The enclosing hills wer...

Chapter Two Preparation

James Harrington Evans was soon impressed by the zeal of this new convert. In a very short time Chapman came to him and asked for baptism. “You will wait awhile, and consider the matter,” said the cautious pastor. “No, I will make haste, and delay not, to keep His commandments!” exclaimed the young man. This reply so impressed Evans that he arranged for the baptism forthwith. It was evident to Chapman that he could not go on in the ways and companionship of the world. He came righ...

Chapter One Birth and rebirth

One Sunday morning early in the last century, the congregation at John Street Chapel, Gray’s Inn Lane, London, were startled by the sight of a young man dressed in a sky-blue swallow-tailed coat, ascending the pulpit steps to stand side by side with their minister. Large gilt buttons added the finishing touch to his outfit and marked him as a member of the fashionable set of the day. But when he began to speak there was a hush; for in restrained, aristocratic tones he explained his purpose...

Foreword

It is a great pleasure to me to see in print a book I saw taking shape some years ago. On the occasions on which the author called at my home in Barnstaple to discuss the collection of data how we wished that the desk at which we sat could speak—what material it would have yielded! Presented to me by H. R. Shapland, it was made about 100 years ago by R. C. Chapman in the workship pictured opposite page 57 and used by the patriarch for many years. Yet, though desks cannot speak, this one ha...

Preface

By Frank Holmes “Barnstaple Patriarch” Victory Press London First published in 1956 Printed in Great Britain at the Press of the Publishers Clapham Crescent, London, S.W.4. All rights reserved Preface This is the book which Dr. A. T. Pierson wanted to write. Had he done so, the public would have been presented with something far more exhaustive than is attempted in these pages. From his time to the present, Chapman has lacked a biographer. The only work of any si...

Choice Sayings

Being Notes of Expositions of the Scriptures Pickering & Inglis 229 Bothwell Street Glasgow 1914 The Gospel The very first sigh on account of sin which is begotten in the heart of a sinner by the Holy Spirit, is the beginning of an eternal communion with God. Among hearers of the Gospel, God remembers the sins of those only who remember not the blood of Jesus. If God build His glory upon Christ, shall not we build on Him our hope of salvation? Do we heartily renoun...
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