John Trew Dickson

Chapter 23 Sam McEwen

The home-call of Sam McEwen on February 5, 1944, in Petersburg, Virginia, caused widespread sorrow among the assemblies throughout the United States, Canada, and the British Isles. An outstanding figure as an Evangelist for over thirty years, Mr. McEwen’s heart-searching messages moved the most careless, while he portrayed the doom of the lost and lifted up a crucified, risen, and glorified Lord Jesus to the gaze of the perishing; and with tenderness and compassion he pleaded with sinne...

Chapter 22 An Account By His Son Charles

Likely my grandparents little thought when they named their infant son John Knox that he would so bear the characteristics of the great Protestant Reformer. Someone has said that my father feared neither man nor devil. Most of my father’s friends have now been called Home, and out of six in our family circle (father, mother, and four children), I am the only one remaining. My father was born in Dromore, County Down, Northern Ireland, on June 20th, 1853. He was saved during meetings c...

Chapter 21 Declining Years

Shortly after our trip together to Nova Scotia Mr. McEwen returned once again to England where he spent many more fruitful years preaching the gospel in England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales. When the Second World War broke out in Europe, many assemblies in the British Isles and individual believers gave themselves to prayer and took deep interest in the spiritual welfare of the boys in the armed forces. Mr. McEwen although in his eighty-sixth year was still very energetic. With his son C...

Chapter 20 Mr. McEwen Revisits Nova Scotia

The following spring Mr. McEwen came out to the USA but was greatly exercised about visiting Port Howe. In view of going, I had just gotten my first car, a model-T Ford, and Mr. McEwen was most anxious to come with me to the yearly July Conference in Pugwash Junction. It was a lovely summer morning in June 1923 when we started off. I drove from Barrington, Rhode Island to Boston where Mr. McEwen was awaiting me and also Mr. Thorpe and his two teen-age daughters. Dr. and Mrs. Kennedy and M...

Chapter 19 A Memorable Conference

In 1922 the writer was living in Barrington, Rhode Island, but had spent much time since 1910 in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick preaching the gospel. I left home in the late summer to hold meetings near Moncton in a community hall that I had already secured. The hall was filled to capacity nightly and I continued until the time for the Port Howe Conference in October. I left for the conference on a Friday morning. In the train I noticed a passenger who looked familiar and, going over to hi...

Chapter 18 Other Pioneers In The Maritimes

As years passed Mr. McEwen’s field of labor extended to many others parts of England, also to Scotland and Ireland. He crossed the ocean many times visiting his friends in the United States and Canada, including Nova Scotia and New Brunswick where he always took a godly and practical interest in the work in these two provinces. It was the writer’s great pleasure in 1910 to see Nova Scotia for the first time. I had met beloved brother David Scott, a servant of the Lord, at the Toronto ...

Chapter 17 The Beginning Of Assembly Testimony

There were a number of well-known godly and saintly brethren in England at that time such as R. C. Chapman, Anthony Groves and his son Henry, George Mueller, Henry Dyer, Mr. Hake and others whom Mr. McEwen got to know intimately. Their godly lives and knowledge of the Word had given confidence and guidance to assemblies in trying days when different circles of assemblies and divisions had brought sorrow among many of God’s precious assemblies. As was well known, Mr. Chapman and Mr. Hake...

Chapter 16 Return To England

After the work was established in Port Howe and also in Doherty Creek, Mr. McEwen became exercised about paying a visit back to the British Isles to see some of the places where he had labored in the gospel years before and to meet some of the trophies of grace that he had seen brought to Christ. He crossed the ocean and visited many familiar places and also greeted many people with whom he had enjoyed hearty fellowship in the past. While in England he visited a town called Crediton in De...

Chapter 15 Pugwash Junction

Doherty Creek, now called Pugwash Junction, only a few miles from Pugwash, became the center of great blessing and a rich ingathering of precious souls to Christ. It also became a time of bitter opposition. It was a rural district and the school house was opened for meetings. When the preacher arrived the place was in darkness, but in the distance he saw a light coming. Mrs. McLeod, a widow, brought a lamp and this was the only light during the first service. Mr. Simpson arrived from Gait...

Chapter 13 George Simpson

One winter day in 1868, a young commercial traveller on his way to London, Ontario, Canada, stopped off at Gait. He had come from England and was a stranger in a strange land. The wares for sale that he displayed to the merchants of the town were only part of the reason for the visit. The noted George Whitfield, about a century before, stood up to address a large open air meeting in Philadelphia. This celebrated preacher read from Isaiah 55, “Ho, every one that thirsteth, come ye to the...
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