John Nelson Darby

Romans 7

Chapter 7 We have seen the deliverance of the believer as to guilt (chapter 5), and as to life (chapter 6). In the seventh chapter we have deliverance with regard to the law. Thus these three chapters give, taken together, deliverance as to the guilt of sin, as to the power of sin, and as to the law which binds upon us both these things. From the details of Chapters 5 & 6 we have also seen that it is always on the principle of death and resurrection that our deliverance rests. It...

Romans 6

Chapter 6 We have in this chapter the second of the three things we have already indicated-the life. The apostle's doctrine is, that we are brought into God's presence by death and resurrection in virtue of the work which Christ therein accomplished. We believe in Him who raised up Christ from among the dead. Can we live in the sin to which we are dead? It is to contradict oneself and one's baptism. But if I am baptised into Christ, it is as having part in His death (for there it is ...

Romans 5

Chapter 5 Verse 1 There is a slight difference between justification and peace, though in simple souls these two blessings go on together. Peace is the consequence of justification. 'Having been justified, we have peace with God.' Though it be by faith alone that we are justified, God, in justifying us, sets the soul in connection with the grace received. One must take account of that in evangelisation and the care of souls. Experience, it is true, is not faith,-we are not j...

Romans 4

Chapter 4 Up to the end of chapter 3 the apostle has developed the sad state of man, and presented the blood of Christ, as answering to this state. In chapter 4 he opens out the new position which the resurrection gives us. In this way holiness of life cannot be severed from justification by grace, because from Christ one receives, at the same time, both righteousness and life. There are three thoughts in this chapter. First, Abraham believed God. Second, when Abraham entered into the...

Romans 3

Chapter 3 Verses 1-8 Here is the proper consideration of the Jews and their state, such as it was in fact, whatever might be the great privileges with which God had honoured them nationally. Christian doctrine, though it reduce the Jew to the level of the Gentile when it is a question of sin, in no way despises the distinctive advantages of the Jew. It owns them, particularly that of being entrusted with the oracles of God. It owns them, even in presence of faithlessness of many ...

Romans 2

Chapter 2 Behold now a class of individuals which differs from the preceding, in that they judge those disorders. Philosophers, moralists, etc., well discerned such a state of things. Were they changed themselves? In no way. Could God accept such things? Assuredly not. If they judged evil, it was not to avoid it; they judged it with others only; and God classes even them among those who possess the truth in unrighteousness. Here the pagan philosopher (vv. 1-16) and the Jew (vv. 17-29)...

Romans 1

Thoughts On Romans 1 To 8 To the end of chapter 3 it is a question of man's state, Jew or Gentile, before God, and of God's answer to that state by the blood of Christ. In chapter 4 we see man justified by blood, being set by grace in a new position, by virtue of resurrection. Chapter 5, 6 and 7 present the application of this life to justification, to the conduct of the justified man, and to his deliverance from the law. Chapter 8 opens out the Christian state founded on this de...

Romans 10

Chapter 10 Chapter 9 has brought before us the sovereign counsels of God towards Israel; chapter 10 occupies us with His ways in respect of Israel during the present period. Verse 1 We may remark, first of all, that the knowledge of the irrevocable counsels of God about Israel had not at all extinguished the affection of Paul for his nation, nor taken away from his heart every hope of salvation for his Israelitish brethren. The thought which delighted his heart and which dre...

Romans 11

Romans 11 The subject of the chapter is this: God has not rejected His people. The apostle gives three proofs that Israel is not finally rejected of God. 1) There is, as in the time of Elijah, a remnant. The rejection which affects Israel does not strike in an absolute way the totality of the people (vs. 1-10).  2) This rejection is not definitive. God, in putting His people aside for a time, calls the Gentiles to provoke His people to jealousy. Israel is not therefore cast off,...

Chapter 2

Hebrews 2 The first four verses of this chapter are an exhortation founded on the preceding one. Observe, this epistle does not begin with an apostolic address, as the others do; but Paul puts himself entirely among these Jewish believers, and speaks of Christ as their Apostle, not himself; and, throughout, he is unfolding all the riches of Christ, to keep them from sliding back into Judaism. Though the gospel of the uncircumcision was committed to Paul, as...
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