John Nelson Darby

Chapter 5, 6

    Perfection here means the state of a full-grown man. There is much, and, in a certain sense, more, contrast than similarity in the allusions in Hebrews to the Old Testament types. We are now in a different position; those things which went before were only a shadow, instead of their giving us a distinct perception of our position. While they were figures, they did not disclose what we have at the present time. We have boldness to enter into the holiest; with them, t...

Chapter 4

    The word of God is connected with the apostleship. (Chap. 3:1) In the last verses the priesthood of Christ the subject. These are the two means of our being carried through the wilderness—the word of God, and priesthood of Christ. Israel were treated as a people brought out of Egypt, but liable to fall by the way. So the warning to these Hebrews, (chap. 4:1) “as to seeming to come short.” The word is softened. In chap. 3 we have seen them addressed a...

Chapter 3

The first title of our Lord in this chapter is connected with the first part of the epistle; the second, viz., the priesthood, refers to what follows afterwards. In chapter 1 also we have His qualification for being the Apostle; in chapter 2, His qualification for the priesthood. He was the Divine Messenger for the testimony He was to bring to earth; and He is gone up on high to exercise His priesthood on behalf of a needy people do...

Chapter 8

    “Set on the right hand of the throne of the majesty in the heavens.” Why so? Because if we have nothing more to be done, Christ has nothing more to do. (I speak not of the priestly work, but of putting away sin.) He has set down—He is resting, having nothing more to do. (Chap 10 ) The offering has been made, and cannot be repeated. (Chap. 8:2 , 3 ) The whole of the priesthood is carried on in heaven itself. The offering was another thing. The offerer bro...

Chapter 9

    In the preceding chapter, the apostle has touched on a very important point, which, as regarded the Hebrews, (and, indeed, any of us,) was a most absorbing one: I allude to the two covenants. The first covenant made at Sinai had a very distinct character, viz., requiring man’s righteousness, and therefore it gendered “to bondage.” What distinguished the law as a covenant was, that, instead of promise, it was blessing held out on the ground of obedience. The dist...

Chapter 10

The practical conclusion is drawn in this chapter of what is brought out in chapter 9 - the unity of the sacrifice; one offering by which the foundation is laid for the new covenant. Instead of finding a man turned out of paradise on earth because of sin, it is now the second Man gone into the paradise of God in divine righteousness - gone in by virtue of a new title. which man never had before. The consequence is, when He comes again in glory, He has nothing to do with sin....

Chapter 11

We have already seen in this epistle that the Hebrews, instead of walking by faith, were in danger of turning back to the things they could see - things suited to them as men in the flesh, such as ordinances and objects of outward importance, of which the Jewish system was full. But Christians were called out of these; God was leading away from them. The constant tendency of all our hearts is to go back. It is a shame for Gentiles to take up with those shadows; in a measure it was natur...

Chapter 12

Two things are the effect of being in the presence of God - alarm of conscience, and encouragement. The presence of God keeps the conscience thoroughly alive, but it is strengthened to look above the evil while seeing the character of it. God brings us into His presence to judge all that is contrary to Him and to strengthen us against it, and that is encouraging. He delights in us, and He delights in conforming us to Himself; thus grace comes in so blessedly, making us parta...

Chapter 13

The closing exhortations - that is, of our chapter - are full of importance, and are, as might be expected from all previously seen, in view of the path in this world proper to the saints, who have Christ appearing in the presence of God for them. They do not, consequently, rise to the height of the communications in Ephesians; for the subject throughout has been the heavenly calling, rather than the mystery of Christ and the church. Brotherly love is to continue spite of ob...

Romans 8

Chapter 8 This chapter is divided into three parts, and presents the following subjects:-1st, the Spirit considered as life (vv. 1-15); 2nd, the Spirit seen personally dwelling in the Christian-God in us (vv. 16-27); and 3rd, God for us (vv. 28-39). Verse 1 'There is therefore'...* The beginning of the chapter is a consequence of all that has been proved in chaps. 5, 6 and 7. Deliverance in Christ (chapter 5) is not touched by the flesh (chapter 6) nor by the law (chapter 7...
Syndicate content