John Gifford Bellett

Conclusion Reflections And Experiences

The soul ought not to need it; but still it is conscious that what has happened in the midst of us has given a fresh sense of oneness with the Lord. The thought that one who had been my object for so many years is now in His company as His object, tells me that there is another link between the heart and heaven. One whom I so lately appropriated here, my Lord now appropriates in Paradise. In circumstances I am thus nearer to Him; and He is of a mind to have it so. The unjealous love of the b...

Preface

By His daughter, L. M. Bellet With Sequel: “The Memory of a Dearly Loved and Only Son.” Preface It may seem strange that after so many years have elapsed since my dear father’s death, I should now print these notes of his life; and I feel that some explanation may naturally be expected. From time to time I have been reminded that he is still held in loving remembrance by friends, and also, that many who never saw him feel almost as if they had known and loved him from bei...

Chapter 1 Early Days

My earliest remembrance of my dear father is connected with our home in Herbert Place, Dublin. Our family consisted of himself, my mother, brother, and great aunt, Alice Dyer, who lived with us. Long before I can remember, he had retired from his profession as a barrister, and had given himself entirely to the ministry of God’s word, in the meetings of the Brethren. Before giving my recollections of him, I should like to mention a few things about his early life, gathered from his ow...

Chapter 2 Domestic Life—Joys And Sorrows

I have now reached the point when I can first speak of my dear father from personal recollection. The very first thing I can recall is the tone of his voice; and I can remember his playing with us, and can almost see him groping his way in blind man’s buff; but perhaps nothing made a more lasting impression on my mind than the way in which, when bidding me “good-night,” he would say some little word of a hymn or prayer. Sometimes it would be a short verse, such as— “Jesus, Thou ...

Chapter 3 Characteristics—Remembered Words

While we were living at Booterstown, my father was invited by the curate of the parish to attend a meeting held by him once a week, where a few gentlemen met together for Bible reading and conversation, and he went regularly unless some other engagement prevented him. He had at that time a weekly meeting for exposition of Scripture at the house of an old lady, who, though herself one of the Brethren, would invite any friends and neighbours who wished to come; and it was always a pleasure ...

Chapter 4 Letters—Thoughts On Passages Of Holy Scripture

Those who knew my dear father will not need to be reminded what his happy relations were with those who, for longer or shorter periods, were associated with him in ministry or service, as Mr. Mackintosh, Mr. Stoney, Mr. Alexander, and others. He was ever ready to welcome all such, and to esteem them “very highly in love for their work’s sake.” I have now to make a few more extracts from letters, and in the first three there are references to the visit of Mr. Andrew Millar to Dublin:...

Chapter 5 Interest In The “Revival”—Hymns

The year 1860 was a time of widely spread religious awakening in Ireland. It began in the North, and was felt in all denominations. My father’s interest was quickly called forth. In the short extract which follows it is mentioned: “Another very remarkable letter from William Lancey yesterday, copies of which are gone from us to London and to Birmingham. H. Bewley was here last evening, and seems to have been delighted and amazed at all he saw in the county of Antrim.” After so...

The Letters From August, 1847, To March, 1848

From his Second Birth to his Death. Brixton, Aug. 16. My dearest——, —Our dear child is still going through much suffering; though the arm itself is better from dear E. C.’s treatment. Nothing is beyond the reach of divine love and power; but I cannot say that my faith draws much upon them in expectation as to his returning health. But all will be in perfect goodness. I can, however, begin to tell of happier things. Last night, as I sat by his bed, he said to me: “Papa, ...

The Memory of a Dearly Loved and Only Son 1849

By His mother Introduction From February, 1829, To August, 1847 From his First to his Second Birth. Our darling child was born in Dublin on the 10th of February, 1829. How little did I then judge that he was appointed of my Heavenly Father to be the occasion of such an experience as he has lately been to my poor heart! It is, however, easy to say, “My Jesus has done all things well”—well, indeed, to the thankful admiration of my soul! At his birth he promised to be str...
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