H.L. Rossier

Introduction

The events of the Book of Ruth take place during the sad conditions and circumstances characterizing the rule of the Judges; yet there is nothing in common between this account's train of thought and that of the account preceding it. The Book of Judges describes the ruin of the people of Israel left to their own responsibility. This ruin was without remedy despite the tender care of divine mercy which sought to restore the people and often succeeded in partially restoring them. In contrast t...

Ruth 1

"And it came to pass in the days when the judges ruled, that there was a famine in the land" (v. 1). These words indicate the specific circumstances of the scene. We are in the days of the judges in the land of Israel. But there is a famine, this is a period when God's providential ways are operating in judgment on His people. "And a certain man went from Bethlehem-Judah, to sojourn in the country of Moab, he, and his wife, and his two sons." Bethlehem, the city which would become the Messia...

Ruth 2

In chapter 1 we have seen the admirable expression of Ruth's faith. Indeed, it is admirable, for such is the character of all that comes from God. Did not Jesus Himself admire the centurion of Capernaum who through faith acknowledged his own unworthiness and the omnipotence of the Lord's word to heal his servant? Chapter 2 now shows us different characteristics of this faith and the blessings that grace brings to it. Up to this point Ruth's faith was resting on the work of grace which God...

Ezra 9-10

Purification of the people. Up to this point, the restoration (for Ezra7 to 10 deal with restoration, rather than with revival) had produced its effects on the company which went up with Ezra to Jerusalem.   Brought by humiliation, fasting and supplications to realize their poor condition and all that they lacked for the service of God, these men realize that only grace can guide and keep them.  They hold fast to the word of God.  Their leaders understand that practica...

Ezra 8

The second exodus In this new exodus, Ezra is accompanied by part of the people who had remained in the province of Babylon.  These people, like their leader, possess an exact genealogical record.  Scriptures mentions all of them according to their families and not, like part of those in Ezra2, according to their cities.  In the first great movement of restoration, there had been relatively little doubt as to the rights of individuals to belong to the people of God, and thi...

Ezra 7

Ezra Here we enter on a new period in our history.  Forty-seven years have passed since the dedication of the temple, approximately sixty-eight years from the time of the decree given by Cyrus.  Ahasuerus (also known by the name of Xerxes), the monarch referred to in the book of Esther, the son of the Darius the Great (Hystaspis) mentioned in Ezra 5 and Ezra 6, had succeeded his father during this interval, and he had been followed on the throne by Artaxerxes his son (Artax...

Ezra 5-6

Revival and the Construction of the temple Ezra 5 In the preceding chapters, we have seen the activity of the remnant of Judah. They were composed, in large part, of people who were able to prove their genealogy. Those who were not able to do so were by that very fact excluded from the priesthood as being profane, but God recognized them nevertheless, as a whole so to speak, and, in the presence of their enemies, they bore certain features which distinguished them from the surrounding ...

Ezra 3

The altar and the foundations of the temple. Our chapter points out a great many other characteristics of the remnant, in addition to the two features mentioned above. "And when the seventh month* came, and the children of Israel were in the cities, the people gathered together as one man to Jerusalem. Then stood up Jeshua, the son of Jozadak, and his brethren the priests, and Zerubbabel the son of Shealtiel, and his brethren, and built the altar of the God of Israel, to offer up burn...

Ezra 1-2

First exodus The first year of Cyrus marks the end of the captivity, just as the first year of Nebuchadnezzar had marked its beginning. Cyrus undertakes the restoration of the people and the temple; his first care is to return to the Jews the utensils for worship, which Nebuchadnezzar had formerly placed in the house of his god. The Persian king was aware of his mission and he knew what God had announced beforehand concerning himself through the prophets. Daniel was capable of instructing...

Introduction

In the third or fourth year* of Jehoiakim, king of Judah, and in the first year of Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, this same Nebuchadnezzar went up against Jerusalem, laid siege to it (Dan. 1: 1), took Jehoiakim captive and bound him with chains of brass to carry him away to Babylon. (2 Chr. 36: 6) At this time, he carried away part of the vessels of the house of the Lord in order to adorn the temple of his god. (2 Chr. 36: 7; Ezra 1: 7; Dan. 1: 2) He also carried away to Babylon a certain ...
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