F.C. Jennings

Isaiah Chapter 47

CHAPTER FORTY-SEVEN "Babylon is fallen—is fallen." Little would it interest those living over three thousand years after the event, if the fall of Babylon, foretold in this chapter, had no bearing whatever on our own time, or guidance for us as individuals, each through his one short life. Babylon has gone—gone long ago! The sands of the desert have long covered the palaces of her princes and the hovels of her peasants; the howls of the wild beasts have replaced the songs of her festiva...

Isaiah Chapter 37

CHAPTER THIRTY-SEVEN Hezekiah's second step: he sends to the prophet. Jehovah's encouragement. The letter. Hezekiah's growth. The song, the sign. The deputation of three, in telling the result of their mission, communicate their distress to the King; their torn clothes, and sorrowful faces speak clearly enough, but they do not give him the words of Rabshakeh in full. Hezekiah may have weakened through fear, and stripped Jehovah's House, but now, at the end of his own resources, he turns at ...

Isaiah Chapter 25

CHAPTER TWENTY-FIVESong of Israel forgiven and restored. What are the "wines on the lees"?The veil over all flesh. Moab; who is meant? Now we consider, and I trust with some true delight, a wondrously beautiful chapter. The strains of those ancient prophets are for the most part sad rather than joyous, and any burst of singing, amid their confessions, tears and stern denunciations, is like that song in the prison at Philippi, a striking witness to the intervention of the blessed God in grace....

Isaiah Chapter 45

CHAPTER FORTY-FIVE Continuation of the prophecy as to Cyrus. How can God be the Author of evil? The introduction of a new chapter again mars the unity of this part of our prophecy, which begins with verse 24 of the preceding chapter, and consists of five strophes, each being introduced by the words, "Thus saith Jehovah." Thus verses 1 to 10 form the second strophe, and speak directly to, as the preceding one spoke of, Cyrus. 1: Thus saith Jehovah to His anointed, To Cyrus whose right hand...

Isaiah Chapter 33

CHAPTER THIRTY-THREE The sixth woe. Spoiler and crafty are not the same individual. The kings of the four points of the compass. The weeping ambassadors. The broken covenant. Jehovah takes the place of a broad river. This brings us to the sixth and last "woe," which, being directed against some power hostile to the Remnant of Israel, is virtually the redemption of that Remnant, and the very "woe" being thus directed, includes many strains of joy which swell in volume till they reach the com...

Isaiah Chapter 15

CHAPTER FIFTEEN The Burden of Moab. A picture of the sorrow that worketh death. One song amid earths groans glorifies God who alone giveth songs in the night. A balance to this. This chapter continues the "burdens," and also continues the intensely animated style of its predecessor. We are tempted to pass them by, as having little that is of interest or profit to us Christians of the Gentiles, so far separated as we are by time, space and conditions from the actors in those far-off scenes. ...

Isaiah Chapter 18

CHAPTER EIGHTEEN What people are designated as "scattered and peeled"? Which is the "land that shadows"? What are the vessels of bulrushes? How can rivers spoil a land? We have now come to a chapter, short indeed, but full of thrilling interest to every lover of the Word of God, and especially to all to whom the study of Prophecy is a delight, as indeed it should be to every Christian in these portentous days. I say of thrilling interest, since it deals with events which, although future, s...

Isaiah Chapter 17

CHAPTER SEVENTEEN The Burden of Damascus. History ever repeats itself. Once more the rod of the Lord falls, and now it strikes Damascus, the representative city of Syria. But as the ten tribes have joined themselves to Syria, entering into an offensive alliance with it against Judah and the House of David (chaps. 7 and 8), they too must share in the infliction, for such a communion always means a "partaking of the evil deeds," and so necessarily of their punishment (2 John 11). In looking b...

Isaiah Chapter 16

CHAPTER SIXTEEN The Burden of Moab, continued. Pride the cause of sorrow. The burden of Moab is continued, and the chapter, a continuation of its predecessor, begins with the Spirit's counsel to Moab by the pen of the prophet thus: 1: Send ye the lambs to the Lord of the land, Send them from Sela through desert, To the mount of the daughter of Zion. 2: As little birds flutter when frighted from nests, So shall the daughters of Moab Tremble at fords of the Arnon. 3: Take counsel, and come ...

Isaiah Chapter 40

CHAPTER FORTY Jerusalem comforted. The expiation of national sins. The three voices.The incomparable grandeur of Jehovah. The blessedness of waiting on Him. The marvelous structure of this chapter may merely provoke wonder without attracting the heart; let us then consider its lovely contents, taking the three parts in order. The prophet is transported into another scene altogether than that in which he corporeally was. Precisely as the New Testament prophet, John, "became in Spirit in the ...
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