F.C. Jennings

Isaiah Chapter 63

CHAPTER SIXTY-THREEThe antiphonal character of the opening verses links themwith Psalm 24. The strange misapplication by the "fathers"which has been almost universally followed. The "winepress"judgment always refers to the Jew, as the "harvest" to the Gentile.Meditation, confession, vehement desire, in natural sequence.The first six verses of this chapter are clearly to be taken by themselves, and form the third and closing section of this minor division of our book. The structure is antip...

Isaiah Chapter 64

CHAPTER SIXTY-FOURJehovah's intervention irresistible. Jehovah'sdiscrimination in judgment. Confession and appeal.This chapter is in such close relation with the preceding one that in the Hebrew Bible the first verse of this is placed in the earlier chapter; and since the second verse, as we have it, speaks of the consequences of Jehovah coming down, we see that there cannot be any real separation between them. The "three" parts may again be discerned thus:1: Verses 1-3: Jehovah's interve...

Isaiah Chapter 62

CHAPTER SIXTY-TWOJerusalem, the metropolitan city of the millennial earth: the centerof light, the focus of all that is beautiful. Her new name.Soul-entrancing have been the visions that have passed before the eye of the prophet, but it is now the Spirit of Christ in the prophet (1 Pet. 1:11) who speaks, and as He in resurrection-joy leads the singing of His people, so here He directs their longings. That same Spirit, indwelling us, directs our desires, and gives expression to them in "gro...

Ecclesiastes Chapter 12

  CHAPTER XII. Our last chapter concluded with the words, "For childhood and youth are vanity": that is, childhood proves the emptiness of all "beneath the sun," as well as old age. The heart of the child has the same needs--the same capacity in kind--, as that of the aged. It needs God. Unless it knows Him, and His love is there, it is empty; and, in its fleeting character, childhood proves its vanity. But this makes us quite sure that if childhood can feel the need, t...

Ecclesiastes Chapter 11

  CHAPTER XI. We are drawing near the end, and to the highest conclusions of true human wisdom; and full of deepest interest it is to mark the character of these conclusions. Reason speaks; that faculty that is rightly termed divine, for its possession marks those who are "the offspring of God." He is the Father of spirits, and it is in the spirit that Reason has her seat; whilst in our Preacher she is enthroned, and now with authority utters forth her counsels. Here we...

Ecclesiastes Chapter 10

  CHAPTER X. The climax of Ecclesiastes' exercises seems to have been reached in the previous chapter. The passionate storm is over, and now his thoughts ripple quietly along in proverb and wise saying. It is as if he said "I was altogether beyond my depth. Now I will confine myself only to the present life, without touching on the things unseen, and here I can pronounce with assurance the conclusion of wisdom, and sum up both its advantages and yet inadequacy." The p...

Ecclesiastes Chapter 9

    CHAPTER IX. The last two verses of Chapter VIII. connect with the opening words of this chapter. The more Ecclesiastes applies every faculty he has to solve the riddle under the sun, robbing himself of sleep and laboring with strong energy and will, he becomes only the more aware that that solution is altogether impossible. The contradictions of nature baffle the wisdom of nature. There is no assured sequence, he reiterates, between righteousness and happin...

Ecclesiastes Chapter 8

    CHAPTER VIII. Still continues the praise of "wisdom." For if, as the last verses of the previous chapters have shown, there be but very few that walk in her paths, she necessarily lifts those few far above the thoughtless mass of men; placing her distinguishing touch even on the features of her disciples, lighting them up with intelligence, and taking away the rudeness and pride that may be natural to them. "Man's wisdom lighteth up his face--its aspect ...

Ecclesiastes Chapter 6

  CHAPTER VI. Remembering how far the writer of our book excels all who have ever come after him, in ability, wisdom, or riches, his groans of disappointment shall have their true weight with us, and act as lighthouse beacons, warning us from danger, or from spending the one short fleeting life we have in treading the same profitless pathway of groaning. So chapter six opens, still on the same subject of wealth and its power to bless. A sore evil, and one that weighs h...

Ecclesiastes Chapter 7

    CHAPTER VII. But whilst the King has not that most blessed light, yet there are some things in which he can discriminate;and here are seven comparisons in which his unaided wisdom can discern which is the better:--   1. A good name is better than precious ointment. 2. The day of death is better than the day of birth. 3. The house of mourning is better than the house of feasting. 4. Sorrow is better than laughter. 5. The rebuke of the wise is better...
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