F.B. Hole

Hebrews 10

In the passage now before us both these contrasts reappear, but coupled with them is a third – the supreme glory of Him who became the sacrifice , as contrasted with both priests and offerings of old. We see Him stepping out of eternity that He might accomplish the will of God in the work that He did. The passage starts with the reminder that the law with its shadow sacrifices could NEVER make the worshippers perfect. It ends with the glorious statement that the offering of Christ has p...

Hebrews 11

We now arrive at the passage which is pre-eminently the faith chapter of the Bible, and it is easy to see how thoroughly it fits into its place in the whole scheme of this Epistle. Judaism as a religious system largely appealed to sight, whereas the great realities of Christianity are unseen and only appeal to faith. The object of the Epistle being to deliver the con­verted Hebrews from the grave-clothes of Judaism which clung to them, and to establish them in the liberty of Christian...

Hebrews 7

In the last verse of chapter 6 the Lord Jesus has been presented to us in two characters. First, as the Forerunner; His arrival in heaven being the preliminary to the arrival there of the children whom God has given Him. Second, as an High Priest after Melchizedec's order, whose ministry ensures the safe arrival of the children, and the fulness of their blessing. This last verse also has completed the digression which began with Hebrews 5: 11, and has brought us back to the exact point ...

Hebrews 12

The opening words of chapter 12 bring us face to face with the appli­cation to ourselves of all that has preceded in chapter 11. All these Old Testament heroes of faith are so many witnesses to us of its virtue and energy. They urge us on that we may run the race of faith in our day, even as they did in days before ours. In 1 Corinthians 9 Christian service is spoken of under the figure of a race; here Christian life is the point in question. It is a figure very ...

Hebrews 13

The first verse of our chapter is very short but very important. The word continue is virtually the same as the word remain, which closes verse 27 of the previous chapter. Only the things which cannot be shaken are going to remain when the great day of shaking arrives; then, let brotherly love remain amongst the saints of God today. It is one of the things which will remain unshaken in eternity. Let us recall that in the early part of the epistle believers are spoken of as the “many...

1 Thessalonians 5

The first and second verses of chapter 5 stand in very direct contrast to verses 13 and 15 of chapter 4. As to the coming of the Lord Jesus for His saints – that which is commonly spoken of as “the rapture” – they had been ignorant, and consequently they were in needless difficulty and sorrow, and the Apostle wrote to them “by the word of the Lord” to enlighten them. But as to “the times and the seasons” they were not at all ignorant and there was no need for Paul t...

Philemon

After reading this short epistle it would be well to read the last twelve verses of the Epistle to the Colossians, especially noting the various names that are mentioned by Paul. No less than eight of those mentioned in Philemon are found in Colossians, and several of them in a way that throws light upon their history. Philemon, a much loved friend and fellow-servant of the apostle, evidently lived at Colosse. Apphia would appear to have been his wife, and Archippus his son, who wa...

Hebrews 5

The early part of chapter 5 continues this subject. The high priests of old represented men and acted for them in things relating to God. But then acting for men they had to be compassionate and sympathetic towards men. Hence they were taken from amongst men, being of the family of Aaron. Had God instituted an holy angel to act as high priest on Israel's behalf there might have been great gain Godward, as regards the accuracy and fidelity with which all priestly functions were carried o...

Hebrews 4

No wonder then that chapter 4 opens with the words, "Let us therefore fear." This does not for one moment mean that we should always be filled with slavish dread, always doubting whether, enduring to the end, we shall be saved. It does mean that we should accept the warning which Israel's history affords, that we should remember the deceitfulness of sin and the weakness of our own hearts, and have a wholesome fear of in any way following in their steps. The beginning of the second ...

2 Timothy 3

With the opening of chapter 3 the Apostle turns from these instructions, which Sprang out of the dangers which were threatening at that moment, to foretell the conditions which should prevail in the last days. The picture that he presents is a very dark one. In the first verse he gives us the general character of the last days in two words-"perilous times." We shall do well to bear this warning continually in mind inasmuch as there can be but little doubt that we are now in the last...
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