F. W. Grant

Introduction to Spiritual Law in the Natural World

AN ATTEMPT TO DEVELOP, ACCORDING TO SCRIPTURE-TRUTH, THE INTERPRETATION OF NATURE. The title of the book which is before the reader will prepare him to find in it a certain sympathy with a recent one, widely known, yet. at the same time with a difference of method which probably will account for a very different result. And yet Prof. Drummond has actually in his introduction anticipated that definition of the truth as to the "Natural" to which by the adoption of it I have committed myse...

Chapter 1 - The Scripture as a Source of Knowledge

Our method at least is a very simple one. It is to appeal to Scripture freely, and in the first place, seeking to use it according to its full value, in faith that it has the highest possible value; in short, that upon whatever it may speak, it will give us, as the Word of God must, truth without any mixture of error, truth that will bear the utmost scrutiny, and stand every possible test. It would be a grand thing, would it not, to have such a standard of appeal, if it could only be pro...

Preface to Spiritual Law in the Natural World

This book's title assures the reader that its subject, at least, is one of great importance. It is, however brief, a connected argument in behalf of the positions, that Nature is, in its every detail, a witness for God; secondly, that its teaching is symbolic, as largely the Old Testament also, the first written revelation, is known to be; thirdly, that it needs, therefore, an interpreter, as it is contrary to all rules of hermeneutics that parables should define doctrine fourthly, that ...

Chapter 4 - Natural Mathematics

Mathematics give us the "exact sciences." "Solid" as Prof. Drummond tells us the laws of nature are, in mathematics at least they are so, beyond the possibility of intelligent question. No one, that I am aware, has ever accused them of poetic license, although poetry on her side does not refuse their alliance. And as we build our foundations of what we can find most solid, it need be no wonder that in proportion as we go down to the foundations of the earth, so do we find mathematics mor...

Chapter 5 - Spiritual Mathematics

That in her great typical system, numbers have a place will be acknowledged by every student of Scripture. How far, however, both types and numbers pervade the whole is little understood, and will by many be with difficulty credited. It would lead us a long way round to try and prove it here, even though, I doubt not, the proof is most important.* We must content ourselves here with the proof of that which lies directly before us - the meaning of the numerals; and even here be briefer th...

Chapter 6 - Tones and Undertones

We now proceed directly to the interpretation of nature in the light of Scripture. And here the first question must be, as to the light itself: is it truly this? Does Nature, read by Scripture, speak as Scripture does? Are these two witnesses accordant? We have not undertaken to verify Scripture according to the ordinary methods. We assume for the present also that what ordinary evangelical orthodoxy holds for truth is in its main features a fair representation of the doctrine of the Bi...

Chapter 11 - Life in its Lowest Circle

Brief as our glance has been, we must now leave the Animal Kingdom, to take up another volume of Nature's library, more ancient, and its language perhaps more difficult to read, and yet where diligence will assuredly find itself abundantly rewarded. The place of the Vegetable Kingdom has been as yet only just indicated. We must try now to realize a little what it presents to us in its primary divisions. But, first, what is the vegetable type itself as compared with the animal? It would s...

Chapter 10 - Among the Creatures

Perhaps, for my own credit, I ought to stop here. Perhaps even for the cause I hope to serve - which is very much to lead others to appreciate more God's gift to us of the creatures, and the full purpose of this gift of God, - I might better stop, content with what awakening of desire I may hope to have achieved, than go further to show how small the distance I have travelled in these inviting fields. I confess that with me that impulsive self of which the Duke of Argyll has spoken to us...

Chapter 9 - Classification

To touch the subject of classification even, one must be very bold, very ignorant or - and I would rather have this considered to be my own case - very confident in his guide. It will be seen, in fact, that I have already touched it, and that my readers have some right to assert that the principles that have been announced ought, if true, to carry one further. If nature has, to the extent affirmed already, in these pages, a numerical structure, then is it at all likely that this should b...

Chapter 8 - Animal and Human

The vegetable has life; and life is a mystery entirely beyond us. Nothing has demonstrated this better than all the labour that has been now for a good while bestowed upon it in the opposite interest. That it is known only to proceed from life is now admitted even by those whose every hope for their theory depends on the speculation that in another age of the world, somewhere, somewhen, it may have been different. In our present inquiry, we are happily delivered from the necessity of dis...
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