F. W. Grant

The Keys of the Kingdom

The mere expression, "keys of the kingdom," shows clearly that there is a definite mode of entrance, and that the kingdom is not in its present form territorial, as the kingdoms of this world are. A Christianized country, for instance, is not by this, or any the more for it, a part of the kingdom of heaven. Men do not come into it by natural birth, as they do into these. There is a mode of entrance, a method of discipling, not in the hands of the men of this world, but in the hands of disciples ...

The Breadth of the Kingdom

There is no need to produce further proof that the kingdom covers the whole profession of Christianity. A glance at the parables should settle this. But we have to see yet that it goes beyond even what we can properly call profession; that discipleship goes beyond this; the kingdom being indeed exactly commensurate with this last,- ideally, with the whole of the baptized. And here I am reminded that in what I shall have to say I must speak contrary to the convictions of many beloved brethren, a...

The Kingdom and the Church

To most Christians perhaps, even at the present day, the kingdom and the Church are one. The Church practically is the whole body of professors: what else is the kingdom? They would not deny that these are different aspects,- that the thought connected with each is different, but they are aspects only of the same thing. We have now, then, to consider how far this difference extends - whether it be only of thought, or of the things themselves. The kingdom we have seen to be the sphere of discipl...

Parables of the Kingdom in Matthew 13

We have now seen what the kingdom is, and learned the general principles by which to interpret that parabolic teaching in which the Lord was pleased to convey to us most of the instruction which we have concerning it. Of these there are first to be considered the seven parables of the thirteenth chapter, in which we have its prophetic history from its commencement in the seed sown by the Lord Himself, until the mystery-form is ended by His appearing in the heavens. It is plain that this alone wi...

Tares Among the Wheat

Thus it is plain that the kingdom in its present form is not to be a universal one. From that which the prophets of the Old Testament picture, it is widely distinguished. Left to man's reception of it, and not set up by the right hand of power, it is received by some, rejected by many; and even where outwardly received, in many cases no real fruit Godward is the result. There are thus "children of the kingdom" who in the end, like those among Israel, are cast out of it; and that where there is n...

Secular Power and the Voice of the Church

Thus we have compassed the whole history of the kingdom of the absent One, up to its solemn close in judgment at His coming. The two parables now before us take us back from this, to look at the same scenes in other aspects. And the two parables, however dissimilar in other respects, have this in common (wherein they differ from the former two), that they speak, not of individuals, but of the mass, as such. They give us the outward form as well as the inward spiritual reality of what Christendo...

The Divine Counsel and Purpose

The three parables which remain to be considered have found interpretations more various and conflicting than the preceding ones, and require, therefore, an examination proportionately the more careful. The former were all spoken (with the exception of the interpretation of the second one,) in the presence of the whole multitude, and they refer to a condition of things to which the world at large is this day witness. But "Then," we read, these four parables having been delivered, "Jesus sent the...

The "Everlasting Gospel"

Parable of the Net Cast into the SeaIn the last chapter of this final three, we find, as I believe, not another aspect of the divine dealings with the mingled crop in the field of Christendom, but a new acting, whether in grace or judgment, after the merchant man has possessed himself of his pearl, or in other words, after the saints of the past and present time are caught up to Christ. "Again, the kingdom of heaven is like unto a net that was cast into the sea, and gathered of every kind; which...

Chapter 3 - Nature in Scripture

If the work of God in nature, then, is admitted to to be any testimony to God at all, that is nothing else but folly which lies hid under what is supposed to be a self-evident truth, that "the Bible was not intended to teach us science." For if science be nothing else than reasoned knowledge, and if it be of importance that Nature should give true witness to her God, who shall presume to say that Scripture will not give us help in such a matter? Is it not, on the other hand, rather to be...

Chapter 2 - God's Twofold Witness

"The testimony of two men is true," says the "Faithful Witness." He appeals to the law for this, and the law speaks as follows: "One witness shall not rise up against a man for any iniquity, or for any sin, of all that one sinneth: at the mouth of two witnesses or at the mouth of three witnesses shall a matter be established." (Deut. xix. 15.) The apostle also cites this law of witness, to which God has very plainly conformed His manifestation of Himself to man. For nature and Scripture ...
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