F. W. Grant

Chapter 5 - The Soul

The Hebrew word for "soul" is (nephesh), the equivalent of which in Greek is (psuche). A fact significant enough in view of what has already come before us when speaking of the word for spirit, is that both nephesh and psuche are, equally with ruach and pneuma, derived from words which signify "to breathe." The same idea of viewless activity enters into them. Even Dr. Thomas tells us that nephesh is from the verb to breathe, although with the characteristic dishonesty which ma...

Chapter 4 - The Spirit of Man

The second application of the word "spirit" is to angelic beings, and that whether "holy" or "unclean." The application of the word in this way is again denied by Thomasism as to the latter class, but this is scarcely the place to examine what they say on this head. It will suffice for our present purpose that there are spirits whose existence as separate personalities cannot be denied. And if this be so, there is no reason, at least beforehand, why man’s spirit also shoul...

Chapter 3 - The Spirit of God

The word which stands for "spirit" in the Old Testament is (ruach), in the New Testament, (pneuma). They are words precisely of the same significance. Both are derived from words which mean "to breathe,"* and in their primary sense therefore signify "breath," or what is a kindred thought, air in motion, "wind." From this as the type of viewless activity, its meaning of" spirit" most evidently and easily derived. The comparison between the two is what the Lord makes in John iii...

The Assembly, in its Practical Working

We come now to consider the assembly itself in its living operation,- as filling (in the power of the Spirit, as alone it can) the place for which God designed it. This place it must, of course, fill, in order to satisfy and to be practically owned of Him; and the ruin of the Church, which all that have the mind of God must acknowledge, has not lowered His standard for it, nor set aside one word that has gone out of His lips. Gracious too, He is, and will be, or who could s...

Chapter 1 - Is the Body All?

PART 1. - MAN AS HE IS (Chapters 1-9) In the language of absolute materialism the body is the whole man. It may need breath or "spirit” (in the Thomasite sense) to make it capable of fulfilling its functions, but in materialistic language, thought, reason, mind, are properties pertaining to "brain in human form." Dr. Thomas gravely adduces Rom. viii. 6, where he translates the "thinking of the flesh," as an irrefragable proof that the "flesh is the thinking substance...

Preface to Facts and Theories as to a Future State

Preface To the Second Edition (1889) A new edition being called for, I have sought to make it as complete as possible; and the book having been stereotyped, the new matter has been put in the shape of an appendix. This has had its advantage, however, in allowing some systems of unbelief which have only lately obtained prominence, and have received, so far as I am aware, little or no examination, to be more thoroughly investigated - a thing demanded by the fact of their d...

Scientific Aspect (d)

The general idea which we gather from all these considerations is certainly in accordance with the thought of the present order of things, as dating from this glacial period. Traces of man’s existence, it is acknowledged, have not been found before it; and the words of a well­known text-book, however much they may be modified in the writer’s mind, nevertheless are quite suited to convey to us the thought of a new creation dating from this time. "In process of time," says D...

Scientific Aspect (c)

5. THE LITERAL DAY INTERPRETATION. The character of the Scripture chaos which precedes the six-days' work we have already seen. The terms "waste and desolate,'' which apply to the earth in this condition, speak of a lapse from the primitive state. The land is buried under the waters, and darkness rests upon it. We have reason to believe, as I have before said, that it had already acquired, in the main, its configuration. "The waters stood above the mountains," says the b...

Living By the Well

Living By The Well An address, given by F.W. Grant on January 2, 1899 "And it came to pass after the death of Abraham, that God blessed his son Isaac: and Isaac dwelt by the well Lahai-roi" (Genesis 25:11). Isaac, on the one hand, is indeed the type of the Son of God Himself, but on the other hand, according to the Apostle Paul's testimony in Galatians, he is the representative of the people of God now; those who are called by grace to the adoption of sons, and who are the children, not of ...

In Christ Jesus

There is, therefore, now no condemnation to them who are In Christ Jesus (Rom. 8:1)."In Christ Jesus" is the definition of all Christians, and it defines them as a people identified with the One who as a man has entered into the presence of God; "for in that he died, he died unto sin once; but in that he liveth, he liveth unto God" (Rom. 6:10)."In Christ" is the language of complete identification. Crucified with Him on the Cross, His resurrection was the divine declaration of our acceptan...
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