F. W. Grant

Lecture 4 - The Breadth of Salvation

(Exodus, chaps. 8: 25; 10: 8-11, 24-26.) Moses is now commissioned and authenticated as Israel's deliverer. Still he hesitates. "O my Lord," he says, "I am not eloquent neither heretofore, nor since Thou hast spoken to thy servant; but I am slow of speech, and of a slow tongue." How hard it is, amid what we call "second causes," to trust simply in God alone! All God's power, for a Moses even, is not sufficient without an eloquent tongue! Paul was wiser when he came to the...

Lecture 3 - A Savior's Signs

(Exodus, chap. 4.) In our previous address we have seen God declaring Himself to Moses as a prelude to the deliverance of His people. In that deliverance He is coming forward accord-ing to the significance of His memorial iiame, to exhibit what He is Himself for His creatures. In salvation God reveals Himself and is glorified; not only in the redeemed of earth, but to the principalities and powers in heavenly places, who learn in us His manifold wisdom and His marvellous g...

Lecture 2 - The Call of the Deliverer

(Exodus, chap. 3.) We have looked at Israel's deliverer from Egyptian bondage. We have seen him given over to death and brought up out of it. We have seen him put himself forward as the saviour of his people, and rejected by them. Then, as rejected by his own, making affinity for himself in the land of his exile. Now we come to look at the call of the deliverer, in the next two chapters. I only take up one of these tonight, as we shall find abundance in it for meditati...

Lecture 1 - Egypt

(Exodus, chap. 2.) The historical books of the Old Testament present to us a regular series of types, each book having a set of its own, connected with a special line of truth, upon which in perfect order the separate gems are strung. To read them aright, therefore, we must see first what is the truth which characterizes each, and then each individual type will find its place. For instance, in the book of Genesis, a series of seven lives is given exemplifying the ...

Lecture 1 - Spiritual Decline and the Judaizing of the Church

(Rev. ii. I-II). We are going, beloved friends, if the Lord enable us, to look at the addresses to the Seven Churches--not indeed in detail, but more especially certain parts of of them--as representative of the state of Christendom as a whole from the time almost when the Lord left the earth until the time in which He comes again. Now, in the first place, it is only right that I should show you briefly what is my warrant for taking these addresses as applying in this way....

Lecture 2 - Nicolatianism; or, The Rise and Growth of Clerisy

(Rev. II. 12-17). We are now going to look carefully at that fifteenth verse: "So hast thou also them that hold the doctrine of the Nicolaitans, which thing I hate." This next stage of the Church’s journey in its departure, alas, from truth may easily be recognized historically. It applies to the time when, after having passed through the heathen persecution, (and the faithfulness of many an Antipas was brought out by it,) it got publicly recognized and established...

Smyrna: The Double Assault of the Enemy

(Rev. ii. 8 - il.) The decline of the Church opens the way for the power of the enemy to display itself; and the assault is a double one - from without and within at the same moment. The result is, however, very different in the two cases. The outside assault is failure, for it is impossible that the Lord should leave His saints to be subdued by power beyond their own; while the defeat of Satan’s wiles is another matter. Here they must put on the whole armour of God, th...

Ephesus: The Decline of the Church

THE ADDRESSES TO THE CHURCHES (Chapters 3-11) (Rev. ii. 1 - 7.) It is not in any wise as being the metropolitan church of Asia that we find Ephesus first addressed. This, which has been the thought of many, has assuredly no countenance from the Word. The Church of God, which is Christ’s body, is not composed of churches, but of members, united together by that blessed Spirit which unites all to Christ the Head. Hence, the "churches," or "assemblies," are only local...

The Son of Man Among the Churches

(Rev. i. 9-50.) We come now to the vision which introduces the messages to the seven assemblies which with it constitute the first part of the book. The second part is similarly introduced by the vision of the fourth and fifth chapters. There is a very evident and characteristic difference between the standpoints of the two. In the one case it is John, companion with the saints in tribulation and endurance, and the scene is on earth; in the other case he is called up to h...

Book 1: The Preface to the Book

Book 1 PRESENT THINGSAs FORESHOWN IN THE BOOK OF REVELATION(Chapters 1-11) The Book and Its Subjcct. (Chap. i. 1 - 5)The book of Revelation is the one only book of New Testament prophecy. As the completion of the whole prophetic Scriptures, it gathers up the threads of all the former books, and weaves them into one chain of many links which binds all history to the throne of God. As New-Testament prophecy, it adds the heavenly to the earthly sphere, passes the bounds of time, and explore...
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