Donald Norbie

Anew Helper Chapter 11

One day in 1945 Mr. Gilbert was back in Tucson and standing on a street corner waiting for a bus. A car pulled up to the curb and a gracious voice said, “Brother Gilbert, would you like a ride?” Indeed he would! He recognized the driver as a lovely widow that he had known for some years. Her name was Lena Waller Spessard. Years earlier she and her husband had come to Tucson for his health. They had responded to his radio program and Mr. Gilbert had visited them both. Now Mr. Spessard was...

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A Godly Heritage Chapter 2

The Gilberts knew how to work. G. M. was industrious in business and the children learned to work. It was not an affluent society. Bruce was selling papers on street cars when he was in the eighth grade. It was rough; he had to get up at five every morning. But he earned about $2.50 each week, good money for a boy in those days. A good pair of shoes sold then for $3.50. When he brought home his first pay, his mother said, “Don’t you think you ought to give something to the Lord?” ...

Building A Nest Chapter 7

Tom Olson was another Gospel preacher from Chicago whom Mr. Gilbert had known as a boy. In 1924 he was given a car but had never learned to drive. Mr. Gilbert asked him why he took it. He said, “I’ll take anything for the Lord. If I can’t use it, someone else can.” Later he gave it to Oliver Smith of Waterloo, Iowa, another evangelist. Olson and Gilbert decided to make a Gospel trip in the car. In addition to preaching and handing out tracts they also painted the car with bold Gospel...

Establishing Assemblies Chapter 6

In 1921 Mr. Gilbert purchased his first tent and pitched it at Bass Lake, Indiana. The spot they chose was a grove of trees between the Holiness Church and the Methodist Church where he had had meetings in 1918. Later that year he pitched the tent in Knox, the county seat. Michael Hoffman helped him in these meetings; he later went to Yugoslavia as a missionary. This was the beginning of a long and fruitful tent ministry for Mr. Gilbert. In all he had thirty-eight tent campaigns. He loved...

Appendix

Because of his many years of close fellowship with Brother Gilbert, the family, with consent of the author, has asked Lloyd Walterick to add this appendix. The information given was taken from notes written by Brother Gilbert. In many places they are worded verbatim as he has written them. * * * * * In 1917 when T. B. Gilbert was called of God to preach the Gospel in the towns and villages of the U.S.A. there seemed to be few preachers who could stay and help solely in a new work fo...

Tennessee Labors Chapter 12

One of the listeners to Mr. Gilbert’s radio program in Tucson was Matthew Shearin. He had been a druggist in Shelbyville, Tennessee, but moved to Tucson for his health. When Gilbert visited him, Matthew assured him of his religious interest. He had been baptized, belonged to church, sang in the choir, taught Sunday School and was a deacon in the church. He was a good man and wanted Mr. Gilbert to know it. Mr. Gilbert said, “A man can do all of those things and not be saved. God says t...

Looking Back Chapter 13

Christians in Tennessee were very appreciative of the help Mr. Gilbert had been to so many of them. At the Mid-South Bible Conference in 1966 they arranged a night to celebrate brother Gilbert’s having been out in the Lord’s work for fifty years. It was a very happy occasion for the Gilberts as they were surrounded by a crowd of friends who loved and appreciated them. A hand-painted portrait of Mr. Gilbert was presented to them. Surely God had been faithful through the years. What wer...

A Godly Heritage Chapter 2

The Gilberts knew how to work. G. M. was industrious in business and the children learned to work. It was not an affluent society. Bruce was selling papers on street cars when he was in the eighth grade. It was rough; he had to get up at five every morning. But he earned about $2.50 each week, good money for a boy in those days. A good pair of shoes sold then for $3.50. When he brought home his first pay, his mother said, “Don’t you think you ought to give something to the Lord?” ...

What is a Darbyite?

James exhorted long ago, “So speak and so do as those who will be judged by the law of liberty” (James 2:12). The lives of believers will be judged by the Lord and this includes their words. Be careful, dear Christian, of your words and how you speak of other Christians. Today some seem to love to accuse others of being Darbyites. This has become a pejorative term, a way to slander another. So what is a Darbyite? John Nelson Darby (1800-1882) was a well-educat...
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