Alfred P. Gibbs

Chapter Sixteen

The Shepherds then showed the pilgrims some of the sights in these parts. The first scene to which they conducted them was a hill called Error. From the top of this hill they were asked to look down the steepest side. As they did so, they saw the bodies of several who had been killed by falling from this high place. When they inquired how these people had come to meet their end, they were told that the hill represented false doctrine, and those whose bodies they had seen at the bottom had no...

Chapter Seventeen

As they continued their journey, the pilgrims came to a place where they saw a path come into their way and which seemed to be as straight as the path on which they were traveling. It was, as it were, a way within a way and they did not know which path to take, for they both seemed straight before them. As they stood still to consider, a man approached them, clothed in a light robe, who asked them why they stood thus. When the pilgrims informed him of their predicament the man said: “Follo...

Chapter Six

After this, the Interpreter led Graceless into another room where he witnessed a still more remarkable spectacle. He saw a fire burning against a wall, and a man pouring bucket after bucket of water upon it in order to quench the fire; but, strange to say, instead of putting it out, the fire rose higher and higher and became hotter and hotter. This puzzled Graceless very much, so he asked the Interpreter to explain why the fire did not go out. Accordingly his guide conducted him to the other...

Chapter Five

After Graceless had recounted his experiences to Goodwill, he was taken a little way along the road in order that the true path might be pointed out to him. When they came to a certain place Goodwill said, “Look before you. Do you see this narrow way? This is the way you must go. It was builded by the patriarchs, prophets, Christ and His apostles, and it is as straight as a rule can make it.” Graceless replied, “Are there no turnings, no windings, by which a stranger may lose his way? ...

Chapter Four

Two men, however, determined to run after him and bring him back by force. Their names were Obstinate and Pliable. They soon caught up to him and Graceless, seeing them, inquired why they had followed him. They replied they had come to take him back to the place where he belonged. But Graceless answered: “That can by no means be, for you dwell in the City of Destruction, the place where I was born, and where, if you die, you must be lost eternally. Nay, my friends, come along with me.”

Chapter Three

Now let us begin the story itself. It opens upon a man whose face is turned from his own home. His clothes are all in rags and a heavy burden is upon his back. As he reads from a book which he holds in his hands, he cries as though his heart would break: “What must I do to be saved?” Who is this man? Where does he live? Why are his clothes so ragged and filthy? What is that burden he carries on his back? What book is he reading, and why does he cry: “What must I do to be saved?” All ...

Chapter Two

Bunyan now began to confess Christ as his Savior and Lord before men. He saw from the word of God that believers were baptized upon their profession of faith in Christ, so he desired to thus obey the Lord in baptism. He was accordingly immersed in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit (Matt. 28:19; Mark 16:16; Acts 10:47; 16:30-33; Rom. 6:3-11, etc.) In the town of Bedford was a company of Christians who were termed “Nonconformists” or “Dissenters,” because the...

Chapter One

It may be well, before we consider the story of The Pilgrim’s Progress itself, to devote a little time to the history of the man who wrote this book, which has been classed, by those well qualified to judge, as the next best book to the Bible. His biography is as interesting as his book, and we shall see later how much of his own life’s history has been woven into the texture of his immortal allegory. Sometime during the year of 1628 John Bunyan was born in the little village of Elsto...

Preface

Or The Story of John Bunyan and “THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS’ Walterick Publishers P. O. Box 2216 Kansas City, KS 66110 Preface An attempt has been made in this volume to reemphasize the sound Scriptural teaching of “The Pilgrim’s Progress” especially to young people, and this is the sole explanation of its existence. Of its many imperfections none is more conscious than the author, but if it leads the reader to a more diligent study of this immortal allegory,...

Scriptural Principles of Gathering - Complete

Scriptural Principles of Gathering OR Why I Meet Among Those Known as Brethren by Alfred P. Gibbs Foreword by John Bloore Plainfield, N. J. February, 1935. As the years pass and the Lord calls home those who have been used to bring out the essential teachings of God's word as to the truth of the gospel and the scriptural order of the assembly, and as a new generation of believers grows up, many of whom are children of the ...
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